New Website for Curriculum Development in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities

We are excited to announce the launch of CDASH 2.0! 

Project leads Kathryn Evans, Roger Malina, and Eun Ah Lee are pleased to announce the re-launch of our 2012 project studying Curriculum Development in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities at cdash.atec.io.

Leonardo Executive Editor Roger Malina and  UT Dallas faculty member Kathryn Evans are inventorying examples of courses and curricula that are in the art-science–humanities field such as courses on art and biology, music and mathematics, art and chemistry, dance and environmental sciences, etc. The re-launched CDASH inventory includes over 120 courses. We are seeking courses at the graduate, undergraduate and primary/secondary level.

Individuals who have taught an art-science-humanities course at the university or secondary-school level, in formal or informal settings, are invited to submit their course on our new CDASH website.

After you log in or register, you may submit you course through an easy-to-complete form.  Those who submit syllabi will have access to the Cloud Curriculum portion of the site, where they can access other syllabi and resource material.

We are interested in the broad range of curriculum that combines the performing and visual arts (music, dance, theatre, film, visual arts and new media) and the sciences. We are looking for submissions of in-person, on-line and hybrid blended courses.

Our new website allows you to easily enter your course and all the relevant details.  Please log in or register before you submit your course. You may also access the other areas of the site. Those who submit syllabi will be admitted to the Cloud Curriculum, where you can download other syllabi and resources.

This project is co-sponsored by The ArtSciLab at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD),  the UTD School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication , and The UTD Center for Teaching and Learning.

For more information, contact us at cdash@utdallas.edu.

Usability Engineering: Improving ARTECA Experience

I work as a UX designer and developer on the ARTECA project from the ArtSciLab.  Every day, I get to think about how to improve the ARTECA interface for our users.  One of the primary ways our team collects feedback from our users is through usability tests, which are run by fellow UX designer Shruthy Sreepathy and myself.  Every month, we bring in someone who has never seen ARTECA before and ask them to navigate through the site, following a set of assigned tasks.  Every time we run this process we discover new potential for improvements.

Recently, I decided to add something new to our usual procedure of testing.  To achieve a better understanding of how our navigation bar elements should be placed, I designed an activity with the purpose of understanding which layout for the navigation bar makes the most sense.

I created a printout on an 11 x 17 inch piece of paper with the basic skeleton of the page (top navigation bar, main navigation bar, main content), but with none of the navigation elements.  For these elements, Shruthy wrote out the names of the links and other navigation items on small, button shaped sticky notes.

After the main portion of the usability test, we closed the browser window and presented our subject with the 11 x 17 printout and the stickies in no order.  With no instructions or other reference, we asked the subject to place the stickies to assemble navigation on the web page that made the most sense to him.  During this process, the subject narrated his thoughts and explained his placement of the different navigation elements.

After running this activity two times, we noticed several patterns that emerged.  Both users expected to see the “Login” and “Register” buttons on the right side of the navigation, which is different than the current navigation which places these buttons on the left side.  Also, both users did not understand the difference between the “Join” functionality and “Register”.  These insights will inform our future designs for the navigation bar.

This activity is one example of a co-creation activity, where the designers work with users to craft designs.  Co-creation activities are a great way to explore how a user thinks, and they are also a lot of fun for us and the user.  Our results are just one data point but we hope to expand this activity and other co-creation activities to gain a richer body of insights for improving our site.  Sound interesting? Sign up here to be part of a future usability test.

Yvan Tina, PhD Student publishes papers in the Technoetic Arts Journal and SciArt Magazine

Yvan Tina is a Phd Student in the School of Arts, Technology and Emerging Communication and member of ArtSciLab. His work investigates the possible convergences of biotechnology, synthetic biology, and artificial life with the performing arts. He is a member of the international, multilingual podcast platform Creative Disturbance where he regularly contributes to Meta–Life and Virtual Africa.

His recent publications include:

1. On Complexism: Pulsion and Computation, Technoetic Arts Journal, Volume 14, Issue 1-2, June 2016

taThis article discusses a concept introduced by art theorist Philip Galanter in several publications over the past decade: complexism is a notion that looks at both past and future while aiming to reconcile (post) modern aesthetics with the cybernetic and biological paradigms. This article focuses on the re-evaluation of the performance arts within the framework of this theory, favoring the idea that every artwork necessarily resists attempts of subordination.

2. Straight Talk with Yvan Tina, SciArt Magazine, April 2016

Untitled

 

In this article Yvan’s insights provide a bridge between the sometimes disparate domains of art and science —a perspective increasingly necessary with the rapid emergence of new materials and technologies available for artistic appropriation.

ArtSciLab Paper by ATEC PhD Candidate Accepted by Union College Symposium on Engineering and Liberal Education

An ArtSciLab paper by Kathryn Evans, Senior Lecturer in Music and ATEC PhD Candidate at UT Dallas, has been accepted for the Union College “Engineering and the Liberal Education” symposium in Schenectedy, NY.

Below is an abstract:


 

“Does studying music enhance higher order learning skills in undergraduate non-music majors?”

Authors:

Kathryn Evans, Senior Lecturer in Music, School of Arts and Humanities, Frank Dufour, Associate Professor, Rosanna Guadagno, Associate Professor and Roger Malina, Professor, Arts and Technology, The University of Texas at Dallas

Abstract:

Many studies have looked at the correlation between music study and academic skills. A review of over 11,000 studies between 1950 and 1990 conducted by Harvard Project Zero tested the claim that studying the arts leads to some form of academic improvement. Only three areas were found that demonstrated a clear causal link between education in an art form and achievement in a non-arts, academic area. Two were in music: a medium-size causal relationship between listening to music and spatial-temporal reasoning and a large causal relationship between learning to make music and spatial-temporal reasoning. (Winner 2001). The majority of these studies have been conducted with students in primary and secondary education, but little research has been done on students at the undergraduate college level who study music, either as a minor or for general interest. Most pedagogical studies in music address the needs of music majors and not non-majors.

This pilot study looked at students at the University of Texas at Dallas who enrolled in music studies (either music performance, music theory or sound design) who are not majoring in music. Many are students in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) areas. Through phenomenological research methods, we looked at the experiences of students who study music or sound design and how they perceived it affects their academic skills in other areas. Emails for students currently enrolled in music or sound design courses in AY2014-15 were obtained from registration records and they were solicited to take an on-line survey, with an option to volunteer for an in-depth interview. Over 800 students were solicited in February 2015 and a response rate of 20% has already been obtained. Additionally, over 30 students have volunteered for the interview. Initial data and a preliminary analysis will be presented.

ArtSciLab Paper Accepted for Understanding Visual Music 2016, Brazil

An ArtSciLab paper by Andrew Blanton, Connectome Data Dramatisation: The Human Brain as Visual Music, has been accepted for Understanding Visual Music to be held June 10, 2015 in Brazil.

Below is an abstract:


 

Connectome Data Dramatisation: The human brain as visual music.

Authors: Andrew Blanton, MFA; Sruthi Ayloo, MS; Micaela Chan, MS; Scot David GreshamLancaster, MA, MFA; Roger Malina, PhD; Tim Perkis; Neil Savalia, BA; Maximilian Schich, PhD; Anvit Srivastav, MS; Gagan Wig, PhD

Abstract

We, as a collaboration of scientists and artists, have built a visual and sonic representation of highly connected areas in the human brain. This model was developed to not only be a tool of scientific research but also as a tool for art creation. In the process of developing the software, the tool was built to interface with musical instruments for real time visualization and sonification. Working conceptually with the idea that scientific data can be repurposed for art creation, the Connectome is performed as both a sonic and visual representation of fMRI data, manipulating the model in real time as a form of multimodal data dramatisation.

Introduction

Partnerships between artist and scientist allow for creative forms of collaboration that can push both scientific and artistic research. With the Connectome Data Dramatisation project, our principal interest was in the creation of a hybridized tool, one that could work as both scientific instrument as well as artistic work. Beginning with a dataset that consisted of 441 neural bundles or nodes systematically differentiated into 21 areas or systems of interest in the human brain based on fMRI data collected by one of us (Gagan Wing) as part of the work of the UTDallas Cognitive Neuroimaging Lab.[1]

Area Centers Coded by System Membership

Our team was able to extract visual and sonic representations of the connections between those areas using custom software. We then developed that representation further in the form of an interactive three dimensional node edge graph and sonification of the 421 highly connected areas of the brain (in the case of the visualization, the width of the edges).

This would form the basis of the representation. With the addition of the ability to activate nodes from external data feeds via Open Sound Control[2] different nodes could be excited at will creating a virtual, three dimensional instrument that could be used for visual and sonic performance. Using four small drums, the visual and sonic representation of connections between areas of the brain can be played in real time. Custom software receives input in the form of audio signal from each drum and excites specific areas of the brain. Each section of the brain that is played will present a unique visual and sonic representation.

Historical Perspective

Building on previous explorations in bridging art and science through the development of new technology, we were actively looking to understand how this project is situated within the history of visual music. In looking at the work done at Bell Labs in the 60’s and 70’s[3] and with the work of artist such as James Whitney[4], the question emerges, what are the components of a successful art and science collaboration? How do separate practitioners collaborate while furthering each of their own research? Phill Mortin and Dan Sandin’s image processing units[5] also played a role in both the conceptual development as well as the technical development of the work. How is information shared and disseminated after it’s creation? Other contemporary artist were looked at as well including the work of Noisefold[6] in their sound extraction techniques form visual information, Ryoji Ikeda[7] in his visual and sonic representation of data as well as Semiconductor[8] in their blending of art and science amongst others working with visual music as a contemporary practice.

Visual music has been historically tied to the development of technology. This holds true now as much as it has in the past. Current rendering technologies are evolving rapidly within the gaming community and practitioners of visual music are greatly benefiting from real time rendering advancements within the gaming communities. Robust community support and the indie gaming movement have provided new tools for interfacing with gaming environments[9]. Two areas that are underdeveloped with regard to these environments and practitioners of visual music can provide insight are in the development of procedural animation, and the assimilation of data into these environments. With this project we have begun to build a framework that can both provide a series of procedural animations with regard to node edge graphs as well as interface a gaming environment with a dataset of approximately 77,000 connections. In doing so we have tried to maintain the work as both a piece of art and a scientific instrument.

Future Work

In the process of building this project, we have worked with many technologies to find the right combination of frameworks and development to allow for extensive flexibility in artistic representation of the data set. We have worked with Max/MSP Jitter[10], Unity[11], Syphon[12], Three.js[13], node.js[14] midi.js[15], coffee collider[16] and D3.js[17] in a exploration to find what technology would serve the representation of this dataset best. Beginning with a representation using three.js hosted on a node.js server we were able to bring in live data via OSC to trigger the model. We found ultimately that building everything in the web browser provided great accessibility for global use of the tool, however, confining the project to the web browser also creates limitations with regard to power for rendering and audio synthesis. We have built a framework that now uses the Unity game development environment specifically for it’s strength with regard to real time rendering and are working on integration of Pure Data[18] via the Kilimba Unity extension[19]. This process will allow us to build a platform addressing the two primary areas of dataset integration into gaming environments and procedural manipulation as well as sonification and visualization of said dataset.

Summation of Findings

The creation of the Connectome project has led to some interesting further work in collaborations between artist and scientist. Beginning with the fundamental question can scientific instruments be used as tools for art creation and can artist tools produce scientifically valid results, our team was working to further a dialogue between artist and scientist while creating real value for each party involved. In doing so we have opened up another path of exploration in the form of using game development platforms for data visualization and sonification as well as the reappropriation of these platforms for use in real time audio visual work. By creating a core representation, we were able to build a model that could be manipulated in real time using incoming Open Sound Control data and provide a scientifically accurate representation of the underlying dataset.


[1] Area of interest in this case were areas of concentration of neurons in the brain as identified by researchers at of the Center of Vital Longevity Cognitive Neuroimaging Lab at the University of Texas at Dallas. http://vitallongevity.utdallas.edu/cnl/ accessed march 7 2015.
[2] http://opensoundcontrol.org/ accessed March 7 2015
[3]http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Archives:Bell_Labs_%26_The_Origins_of_the_Multimedia_Artist accessed March 7 2015
[4] William Moritz on James Whitney’s Yantra and Lapis http://www.centerforvisualmusic.org/WMyantra.htm accessed March 7 2015
[5] Museum of Modern Art https://www.moma.org/momaorg/shared/pdfs/docs/press_archives/5958/releases/MOMA_1982_0014_14.pdf?2010 accessed March 7 2015
[6] http://noisefold.com/
[7] http://press.web.cern.ch/press-releases/2014/01/japanese-artist-ryoji-ikeda-wins-third-prix-ars-electronica-collide-cern
[8] http://semiconductorfilms.com/
[9] http://pjim.newschool.edu/issues/2011/01/pdfs/ParsonsJournalForInformationMapping_Medler-Ben+Magerko-Brian.pdf
[10] https://cycling74.com/ accessed March 7 2015
[11] http://unity3d.com/5 accessed March 7 2015
[12] http://syphon.v002.info/ accessed March 7 2015
[13] http://threejs.org/ accessed March 7 2015
[14] https://nodejs.org/ accessed March 7 2015
[15] http://mudcu.be/midi-js/ accessed March 7 2015
[16] https://github.com/mohayonao/CoffeeCollider/wiki accessed March 7 2015
[17] http://d3js.org/ accessed March 7 2015
[18] http://puredata.info/ accessed March 7 2015
[19] https://github.com/hagish/kalimba accessed March 7 2015

Jack Ox Joins ArtSciLab as a Research Fellow!

Jack Ox is an artist who used research as the method behind her art works and is now taking the procedures developed as an artist to the scientific and engineering world of visualization. She is also a longtime member of Leonardo Journal’s editorial board, and has served as both a Research Assistant Professor in Art and Art History, and Research Associate Professor of Music at the University of New Mexico; also at UNM, she is a researcher at the Center for Advanced Computing (CARC). Ox just finished a PhD dissertation on “Manifestations of Conceptual Metaphor and Blending Theories” for Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne. Her 30-year career of mapping musical scores to paintings such as Kurt Schwitters’s intermedia masterpiece, “Ursonate,” can be seen at http://www.jackox.net/pages/Ursonate/ur_MAINindex.html and virtual reality renditions, such as the “Gridjam” at http://www.jackox.net/pages/gridjamIndex.html. Recently, Ox presented a paper at the IEEE VIS 2014 conference in Paris on how knowledge representers can use analogy and conceptual blending in visualizations.

Jack Ox, together with Fluxus artist Ken Friedman, is leading the 3-year Leonardo symposium on the PhD in Art and Design. This project is documenting best methods and practices, as well as issues and challenges, that are emerging with the introduction of the PhD in Art and Design in universities internationally and in particular for hybrid professionals in theh art-science and art-technology fields.

Richard Wirth Appointed as the First Leonardo Fellow!

Richard Wirth is a Master’s candidate in the Arts and Technology program at the University of Texas at Dallas. Richard’s fellowship will be designed around his research of MMORPGs (Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games) as interactive storytelling environments, comparing the function of secondary oral media across different modes of social interaction through the lens of video game ethnography. During his fellowship, Richard will explore Leonardo publications for his writings and research and also will serve as a guest editor of the Leonardo On-Line blog, among other activities.

The Leonardo Fellowship program recognizes accomplished graduate students and junior faculty from Leonardo Senior Affiliate organizations. Selected Leonardo Fellows will have an opportunity to advance their selected research or project area through such activities as publishing in the internationally renowned Leonardo journal or creating a unique art-science project under the auspices of Leonardo, as well as to receive mentorship from senior Leonardo editors. The Leonardo Fellowship includes a cash stipend of $1,000 (U.S.).

Throughout its history, Leonardo has presented the work of renowned international theorists, artists, scientists, curators and other practitioners of contemporary art involving 20th- and 21st-century media. The Leonardo Archive, spanning nearly 50 years, provides a rich basis for exploration of the genesis of art-science work, from the introduction of pioneering applications in kinetic art, computer animation, net art, interactive, telematic, algorithmic and genetic art, environmental, bio and land art to more recent artistic applications in nano art, CAVE installation work, augmented reality, artificial intelligence, wearables, sound art, cloud-based art and beyond.

Fellowships may be realized in a variety of possible forms, such as (but not limited to):

  • Guest-editing a themed special section in Leonardo journal
  • Curating a Leonardo Gallery devoted to work in the field of art-science-technology
  • Researching a topic area drawing on the 50-year Leonardo archive, leading to publication of an article in Leonardojournal or Leonardo On-Line
  • Or another project that utilizes the content or other resources of the Leonardo Network.

The creativity of the proposal will be a factor in the selection of Leonardo Fellows. Leonardo Fellows will also have opportunities to interface with the Leonardo community:

  • One month as a guest editor of the Leonardo On-Line Blog
  • Opportunity to speak at a Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous (LASER) event.

Note: Submitted writings and projects are subject to editorial review and are not guaranteed to be published.

Who is eligible? During the announced nomination period, Leonardo Senior Affiliate Members may nominate one (1) graduate student for the Fall Fellowship and one (1) junior faculty member for the Spring Fellowship.

What is a Senior Affiliate Member? A Senior Affiliate Member is a paying member institution, department, lab or organization that is creating work in the intersection of art, science and technology. For more information about the many benefits of joining the Leonardo Affliate Program, please see www.leonardo.info/affiliates.

The nomination process: We accept nominations twice a year for the two fellowships: an autumn fellowship for a graduate student and a spring fellowship for a junior faculty member.

           Step 1 Nomination period opens and is announced by the Leonardo Affiliate Program. Senior Affiliates are invited submit a nomination.

           Step 2 The Leonardo Senior Affiliate nominator sends a preliminary email to Leonardo/ISAST indicating the name and position of the organization’s nominee and his/her contact information and including the nominator’s letter of recommendation in support of the nominee.

           Step 3 Upon acknowledgmentand request by Leonardo/ISAST, the nominee submits a project proposal as well as a resume and writing sample for consideration.

Where and when is the fellowship? The fellowships are conducted remotely, with periodic telephone or video contact with the Leonardo editors. The duration of each fellowship is either one academic quarter or semester. One fellowship takes place at a time, rotating between the graduate student and the junior faculty fellowship.

Does the fellowship offer a stipend? We offer a $1,000 stipend, awarded at the beginning of the fellowship project.

Have more questions? Contact Danielle Siembieda, Leonardo Affiliate Manager, dani…@leonardo.info

Timeline of Spring 2015 Fellowship (Junior Faculty Members)

October 15, 2014:  Fellowship Nomination Period Announced (for Fall: Graduate Student Nominations Only)
November 15, 2014:  Fellowship Nominations and supporting materials due
December 15, 2014:  Materials From Nominee Due 
January 15, 2015:  Fall Fellowship Awardee announced
February 15, 2015:  Fall Fellowship begins
April 30, 2015:  Fall Fellowship ends

The Leonardo Affiliate Program

The UT Dallas ArtSci Lab is pleased to welcome Guy Edmonds as an affiliate research fellow

The UT Dallas ArtSci Lab is pleased to welcome Guy Edmonds as an affiliate
research fellow. Roger Malina is serving on Guy Edmonds’ PhD Committee
in the Cognovo
consortium on cognitive innovation ( www.cognovo.eu) at the University
of Plymouth. His PhD topic is on
Early Cinema and Cognitive Creativity. The committee is chaired by
Professor Michael Punt head of
the Transtechnology Research project: http://trans-techresearch.net/.
The ArtSciLab and the
Transtech program have a series of ongoing collaborations.

Guy Edmonds Project: Early cinema and Cognitive Creativity

An interdisciplinary investigation of the cognitive impact of analogue
and digital film projection technologies.

http://www.cognovo.eu/people/research-fellows/guy-edmonds.php

Background

Guy Edmonds is a film maker and professional film restorer and archivist who has
previously worked at The Cinema Museum in London, Christie’s Camera
and Photographic auctions, and the EYE Film Institute (formerly
Nederlands Filmmuseum).

His research interests in early cinema and home movies have led to two
unique programming events in which new contexts are proposed for found
films – The Séance du Cinema performances where spiritualistic mediums
attempt to divine further information about the unknown protagonists
of found home movies and the Saloon of Refuse in which a wide variety
of often fragmentary film forms are saved from landfill for last
chance saloon screenings.

His writings on the subject of Home Movies and Amateur film have
appeared in specialised edited volumes, the academic journal, Film
History, the monthly film magazine, Skrien, and the Stichting
Amateurfilm magazine and website.

He organised the first Home Movie Days in London and since 2008 has
been a co-organiser of the Home Movie Days at EYE in Amsterdam. He is
a member of the artist-run cooperative, Filmwerkplaats in Rotterdam,
and a performer with the Projector Orchestra.

Immersive Cinema

David Marlett is researching and developing technologies and artistic techniques necessary to produce live-action
‘feature films’ to be experienced entirely within a head-mounted display such as an Oculus Rift or Sony Morpheus.

As part of his PhD dissertation research at the Arts & Technology Program (ATEC) at The University of Texas (Dallas),Marlett is developing, and intends to then produce, his screenplay,BLUE HIGHWAY,as quite possibly the first feature length, live action Immersive Cinema 3D-360 film.
(This will be developed out of theArtSciLab in ATEC, where Marlett is a Research Fellow.)  BLUE HIGHWAY has been in development as both a play and a film, due to its theatrical feel, limited sets and intimate dialogue.  It is thus ideal for Immersive Cinema which is, production-wise,
akin to filming a play from the front row.

http://www.dmarlett.com/immersive-cinema

ArtSciLab Researchers Roger Malina and Andrew Blanton Present their work at the Inaugural LASER

ArtSciLab researchers Roger Malina and Andrew Blanton will be presenting their work at the inaugural LASER in Austin Texas on March 4.

The LASER series is being organised by JD Talasek, the Cultural Director of the US National Academy of Science. Malina and Blanton will present in particular the ArtSciLab work in collaboration with Professor Gagan Wig of UT Dallas ( http://bbs.utdallas.edu/people/detail.php5?i=1131 )

His research program uses a combination of structural and functional imaging tools (including fMRI, DTI, and TMS) to understand the organization of large-scale human brain networks and how these networks change over the adult-lifespan. The Art Sci Lab is working with him to develop innovative ways of representing the data, in particular using data sonication techniques.

The resulting work is intended to develop scientifically useful research tools but also create compelling art work.

Further details on the ArtSciLab can be found at : https://artscilab.atec.io/

Join us for

The Inaugural ATX LASER: March 4th , 2014 at 7 p.m.

Space is limited so RSVP today by emailing atxlaser@umlaufsculpture.org

The UMLAUF proudly announces the inauguration of ATX LASER (Austin, Texas – Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous), a salon series culminating at the intersection of art and science. In today’s environment of new technologies and scientific advancements, cultivation of creativity among all areas of human endeavor is paramount to knowledge production and fully understanding the impact of our changing world on the development of our identity within it. Over the next year, this salon will explore such diverse topics as: the impact and creative application of technology; the intersection of anatomy, art and genetics; arts role in environmental education and activism; visualizing and understanding Big Data; building community and communication between disciplines; and much more.

Akin to successful art-science programs in London, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, Stanford University, UC Berkeley, UCLA, UC David, UC Santa Cruz, and New York City, ATX LASER provides an opportune environment for progressive thought leaders to come together to form community and explore the intersections of disciplinary thinking. ATX LASER welcomes innovators of all types: artists, scientists, curators, scholars, engineers, designers, and educators, to participate. Throughout his life’s work, Charles Umlauf explored the relationship of art and science through both process and symbolism. Emphasizing the importance of sharing ideas and knowledge as a platform of its mission, the UMLAUF offers the ideal creative crucible for seemingly unrelated disciplines to reconvene.

Each ATX LASER session will feature multimedia presentations and three to four speakers, each given the opportunity to address a compelling aspect of their research. Following the presentations, an open discussion will commence where participation is welcomed and encouraged from all attendees. All ATX LASERs are free and open to the public. Please join us at ATX LASER’s launch: Tuesday, March 4th, 2014.

The UMLAUF is proud to be partnering with Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology (Leonardo/ISAST), a non-profit organization that serves the global network of distinguished scholars, artists, scientists, researchers, and thinkers through programs focused on interdisciplinary work, creative output, and innovation.

ATX LASER was conceived by J.D. Talasek, Scholar-in-Residence, UMLAUF. Talasek is Director of Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. and the founder of that city’s DASER program. His co-organizers for ATX LASER are Katie Robinson Edwards, PhD., UMLAUF Curator, and Diane Sikes, UMLAUF Director of Programs. ATX LASER is made possible through the generous support of J.D. Talasek and the UMLAUF.

At ATX LASER, art and science will unite in the serene environment of Lawrence Speck’s architectural gem amidst the UMLAUF gardens. The UMLAUF was founded in 1991 with the mission of exhibiting the work of Charles Umlauf (1911-1994) and other contemporary sculptors in a natural setting and providing educational experiences that encourage the understanding and appreciation of sculpture. An inventive problem solver, in his lifetime Umlauf engaged with the fields of anatomy, architecture, engineering, and geology. ATX LASER pays homage to Umlauf’s creative vision and will include future sessions relating directly to the sculptor’s vast oeuvre.

The Inaugural ATX LASER: March 4th , 2014 at 7 p.m.

Space is limited so RSVP today by emailing atxlaser@umlaufsculpture.org

SPEAKERS:

o Katie Robinson Edwards , UMLAUF Curator

– TOPIC: A brief introduction on behalf of the UMLAUF

o J.D. Talasek , Moderator.

– TOPIC: “Shaping Community around Creativity and Innovation”

o Roger Malina , Arts and Technology Distinguished Chair, University of Texas at Dallas Roger. Malina is a physicist, astronomer, Executive Editor of Leonardo Publications at MIT Press, Professor of Physics and Associate Director of the Arts and Technology Program at UT Dallas.

– TOPIC: The ArtSciLab at UT Dallas opened in the fall of 2013 with the objective of enabling in depth collaboration between artists and scientists. Our first projects involve manipulating data from astronomy, brain sciences and geo-sciences

o Andrew Blanton , a composer and media artist. Blanton is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Texas at Dallas and is a Research Fellow in the ATEC ArtSciLab.

– TOPIC: interactive installation called MODULATOR, will be co-presenting with Roger Malina

o Francesca Samsel, Visual Artist. Austin-based artist Francesca Samsel uses scientific visualization and high-resolution displays to create digital murals inspired by scientific research.

– Topic: Art-Sci-Vis: Stirring the Mix, Creating Multiple Outcomes

o Kathy Ellins, Program Manager at the Institute for Geophysics in the Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin. Trained as a geochemist,

– Topic: Geoscience Through the Lens of Art: Examples From The American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting

BE A PART OF THE ATX LASER COMMUNITY. MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR UPCOMING SALONS AT THE UMLAUF:

May 20 , 2014

July 15, 2014

September 16, 2014

November 18, 2014

 

For more information visit http://umlaufsculpture.org/

Or email JD Talasek at jtalasek@nas.edu

RSVP at atxlaser@umlaufsculpture.org