Clark Scholars Boost Research Skills Through Summer Program

Twenty-four UT Dallas students, most of them freshmen, got a head start on their undergraduate experiences by spending nine weeks this summer conducting research on campus.

The Anson L. Clark Summer Research Program, coordinated by the Office of Undergraduate Education, saw projects ranging from the development of prosthetic casings to the design of “smart” agricultural systems. Students recently displayed their research results during a poster presentation and symposium. Incoming UT Dallas students who have been awarded Academic Excellence Scholarships are eligible to apply to be Clark Scholars. No previous research experience is necessary.

“Every year I’m amazed at how these students progress in nine short weeks, both socially and in their grasp of advanced research methods,” said Courtney Brecheen, associate dean in the Office of Undergraduate Education. “For many, participation in this program is their first chance to socialize with other university students and become acclimated to campus. It doesn’t take long before they really come together as a group, and by the end of the summer, they have mastered the art of articulating complex research to a general audience.”

The 2016 class of Clark Scholars collaborated with mentors in School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication (ATEC), the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science. Nearly all of the students intend to continue their research with their mentors’ lab groups during the upcoming year, Brecheen said.

Dr. Paul Pantano, associate professor of chemistry and past recipient of the Provost’s Award for Faculty Excellence in Undergraduate Research Mentoring, serves as the program’s scientific adviser.

Among the participants was Joel Ewing, a first-year ATEC student, who worked with Cassini Nazir, ATEC professor and director of design and research of ArtSciLab, and Dr.Roger Malina  Distinguished Professor of Arts and Technology, to design a website. ARTECA — a collaboration between UT Dallas’ ArtSciLab, which Malina directs, and the MIT Press — will be an online curated space of essential content in an interdisciplinary field where art, science and technology meet.

2

ATEC student Joel Ewing helped design a website that aggregates scholarly content in an interdisciplinary field that combines art, science and technology. Dr. Roger Malina, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Technology, was his faculty mentor.

 

“The problem was, there was no central place to access materials related to this field,” Ewing said. “When ARTECA is launched, UT Dallas students will have free access to it, and other universities can subscribe. My role as a designer was to look for and address issues that affect user experience.”

Hannah Barber, a first-year student in biomedical engineering who led a collaborative project with ATEC students to design and produce decorative casings for lower limb prosthetics. She worked with faculty mentor Dr. Robert Gregg, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and bioengineering, along with students of Andrew Scott, associate professor of arts and technology.

Computer science students Daniel Garcia and Christopher Janusa spent the summer working together to develop “smart” electronics for agriculture applications. Their faculty mentor was Dr. Subbarayan Venkatesan, professor of computer science.

“There is a need for agriculture systems that are automated, simple to use and configurable,” Garcia said. “This could include systems like automated irrigation and temperature control.”

The students envisioned a smart system that includes sensors and actuators that monitor, for example, temperature and soil moisture, and could be integrated with weather data to automatically adjust irrigation and other actions according to the forecast. Users could use a web interface to regulate the system, Garcia said.

The Clark Summer Research Program is funded by an endowment from the Clark Foundation, whose philanthropy has supported scholarly endeavors at several Texas colleges and universities, such as the Anson L. Clark Memorial Lecture and the Dr. Anson L. Clark Presidential Scholarship at UT Dallas.

Bridging the Silos: Curriculum Development as a Tool for Crossing Disciplines in the Arts, Sciences and Humanities

To be published in the Leonardo Electronic Almanac Special Issue:  The Culture of Digital Education

Abstract
A survey of current cross-disciplinary offerings in higher education is needed to understand the mechanisms that were employed to offer them and their pedagogical basis. We present here a study that analyzes a compendium of arts-science-humanities cross-disciplinary courses that was created through several Calls for Contributions from 2009 to 2013.

A web site was created and over 100 submissions were posted at utdallas.edu/atec/cdash/ . The data from the courses was analyzed as to the nature of the cross-disciplines, level of offering (graduate vs. undergraduate), geographical location, level of collaboration (number of instructors), and the department(s) offering the course.

A comprehensive re-visioning of curricular structure to encourage collaborative teaching of integrative courses and programs is needed. Suggested actions include specific ideas to enhance networking and visibility, sharing of syllabi and course materials, and a research effort to demonstrate the effectiveness of cross-disciplinary art-science-humanities courses.

This preliminary study points the way towards further efforts in curricular design and research that will be required for cross-disciplinary arts-science-humanities courses to be integrated into the college curriculum.

View the full paper here

Kathryn Evans, Senior Lecturer in Music, School of Arts and Humanities,
kcevans@utdallas.edu
website

Roger Malina, Professor and Associate Director, Arts and Technology (ATEC), and CNRS Aix-Marseille University. School of Arts and Humanities,
roger.malina@utdallas.edu
website

ArtSciLab Paper by ATEC PhD Candidate Accepted by Union College Symposium on Engineering and Liberal Education

An ArtSciLab paper by Kathryn Evans, Senior Lecturer in Music and ATEC PhD Candidate at UT Dallas, has been accepted for the Union College “Engineering and the Liberal Education” symposium in Schenectedy, NY.

Below is an abstract:


 

“Does studying music enhance higher order learning skills in undergraduate non-music majors?”

Authors:

Kathryn Evans, Senior Lecturer in Music, School of Arts and Humanities, Frank Dufour, Associate Professor, Rosanna Guadagno, Associate Professor and Roger Malina, Professor, Arts and Technology, The University of Texas at Dallas

Abstract:

Many studies have looked at the correlation between music study and academic skills. A review of over 11,000 studies between 1950 and 1990 conducted by Harvard Project Zero tested the claim that studying the arts leads to some form of academic improvement. Only three areas were found that demonstrated a clear causal link between education in an art form and achievement in a non-arts, academic area. Two were in music: a medium-size causal relationship between listening to music and spatial-temporal reasoning and a large causal relationship between learning to make music and spatial-temporal reasoning. (Winner 2001). The majority of these studies have been conducted with students in primary and secondary education, but little research has been done on students at the undergraduate college level who study music, either as a minor or for general interest. Most pedagogical studies in music address the needs of music majors and not non-majors.

This pilot study looked at students at the University of Texas at Dallas who enrolled in music studies (either music performance, music theory or sound design) who are not majoring in music. Many are students in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) areas. Through phenomenological research methods, we looked at the experiences of students who study music or sound design and how they perceived it affects their academic skills in other areas. Emails for students currently enrolled in music or sound design courses in AY2014-15 were obtained from registration records and they were solicited to take an on-line survey, with an option to volunteer for an in-depth interview. Over 800 students were solicited in February 2015 and a response rate of 20% has already been obtained. Additionally, over 30 students have volunteered for the interview. Initial data and a preliminary analysis will be presented.

ArtSciLab Paper Accepted for Understanding Visual Music 2016, Brazil

An ArtSciLab paper by Andrew Blanton, Connectome Data Dramatisation: The Human Brain as Visual Music, has been accepted for Understanding Visual Music to be held June 10, 2015 in Brazil.

Below is an abstract:


 

Connectome Data Dramatisation: The human brain as visual music.

Authors: Andrew Blanton, MFA; Sruthi Ayloo, MS; Micaela Chan, MS; Scot David GreshamLancaster, MA, MFA; Roger Malina, PhD; Tim Perkis; Neil Savalia, BA; Maximilian Schich, PhD; Anvit Srivastav, MS; Gagan Wig, PhD

Abstract

We, as a collaboration of scientists and artists, have built a visual and sonic representation of highly connected areas in the human brain. This model was developed to not only be a tool of scientific research but also as a tool for art creation. In the process of developing the software, the tool was built to interface with musical instruments for real time visualization and sonification. Working conceptually with the idea that scientific data can be repurposed for art creation, the Connectome is performed as both a sonic and visual representation of fMRI data, manipulating the model in real time as a form of multimodal data dramatisation.

Introduction

Partnerships between artist and scientist allow for creative forms of collaboration that can push both scientific and artistic research. With the Connectome Data Dramatisation project, our principal interest was in the creation of a hybridized tool, one that could work as both scientific instrument as well as artistic work. Beginning with a dataset that consisted of 441 neural bundles or nodes systematically differentiated into 21 areas or systems of interest in the human brain based on fMRI data collected by one of us (Gagan Wing) as part of the work of the UTDallas Cognitive Neuroimaging Lab.[1]

Area Centers Coded by System Membership

Our team was able to extract visual and sonic representations of the connections between those areas using custom software. We then developed that representation further in the form of an interactive three dimensional node edge graph and sonification of the 421 highly connected areas of the brain (in the case of the visualization, the width of the edges).

This would form the basis of the representation. With the addition of the ability to activate nodes from external data feeds via Open Sound Control[2] different nodes could be excited at will creating a virtual, three dimensional instrument that could be used for visual and sonic performance. Using four small drums, the visual and sonic representation of connections between areas of the brain can be played in real time. Custom software receives input in the form of audio signal from each drum and excites specific areas of the brain. Each section of the brain that is played will present a unique visual and sonic representation.

Historical Perspective

Building on previous explorations in bridging art and science through the development of new technology, we were actively looking to understand how this project is situated within the history of visual music. In looking at the work done at Bell Labs in the 60’s and 70’s[3] and with the work of artist such as James Whitney[4], the question emerges, what are the components of a successful art and science collaboration? How do separate practitioners collaborate while furthering each of their own research? Phill Mortin and Dan Sandin’s image processing units[5] also played a role in both the conceptual development as well as the technical development of the work. How is information shared and disseminated after it’s creation? Other contemporary artist were looked at as well including the work of Noisefold[6] in their sound extraction techniques form visual information, Ryoji Ikeda[7] in his visual and sonic representation of data as well as Semiconductor[8] in their blending of art and science amongst others working with visual music as a contemporary practice.

Visual music has been historically tied to the development of technology. This holds true now as much as it has in the past. Current rendering technologies are evolving rapidly within the gaming community and practitioners of visual music are greatly benefiting from real time rendering advancements within the gaming communities. Robust community support and the indie gaming movement have provided new tools for interfacing with gaming environments[9]. Two areas that are underdeveloped with regard to these environments and practitioners of visual music can provide insight are in the development of procedural animation, and the assimilation of data into these environments. With this project we have begun to build a framework that can both provide a series of procedural animations with regard to node edge graphs as well as interface a gaming environment with a dataset of approximately 77,000 connections. In doing so we have tried to maintain the work as both a piece of art and a scientific instrument.

Future Work

In the process of building this project, we have worked with many technologies to find the right combination of frameworks and development to allow for extensive flexibility in artistic representation of the data set. We have worked with Max/MSP Jitter[10], Unity[11], Syphon[12], Three.js[13], node.js[14] midi.js[15], coffee collider[16] and D3.js[17] in a exploration to find what technology would serve the representation of this dataset best. Beginning with a representation using three.js hosted on a node.js server we were able to bring in live data via OSC to trigger the model. We found ultimately that building everything in the web browser provided great accessibility for global use of the tool, however, confining the project to the web browser also creates limitations with regard to power for rendering and audio synthesis. We have built a framework that now uses the Unity game development environment specifically for it’s strength with regard to real time rendering and are working on integration of Pure Data[18] via the Kilimba Unity extension[19]. This process will allow us to build a platform addressing the two primary areas of dataset integration into gaming environments and procedural manipulation as well as sonification and visualization of said dataset.

Summation of Findings

The creation of the Connectome project has led to some interesting further work in collaborations between artist and scientist. Beginning with the fundamental question can scientific instruments be used as tools for art creation and can artist tools produce scientifically valid results, our team was working to further a dialogue between artist and scientist while creating real value for each party involved. In doing so we have opened up another path of exploration in the form of using game development platforms for data visualization and sonification as well as the reappropriation of these platforms for use in real time audio visual work. By creating a core representation, we were able to build a model that could be manipulated in real time using incoming Open Sound Control data and provide a scientifically accurate representation of the underlying dataset.


[1] Area of interest in this case were areas of concentration of neurons in the brain as identified by researchers at of the Center of Vital Longevity Cognitive Neuroimaging Lab at the University of Texas at Dallas. http://vitallongevity.utdallas.edu/cnl/ accessed march 7 2015.
[2] http://opensoundcontrol.org/ accessed March 7 2015
[3]http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Archives:Bell_Labs_%26_The_Origins_of_the_Multimedia_Artist accessed March 7 2015
[4] William Moritz on James Whitney’s Yantra and Lapis http://www.centerforvisualmusic.org/WMyantra.htm accessed March 7 2015
[5] Museum of Modern Art https://www.moma.org/momaorg/shared/pdfs/docs/press_archives/5958/releases/MOMA_1982_0014_14.pdf?2010 accessed March 7 2015
[6] http://noisefold.com/
[7] http://press.web.cern.ch/press-releases/2014/01/japanese-artist-ryoji-ikeda-wins-third-prix-ars-electronica-collide-cern
[8] http://semiconductorfilms.com/
[9] http://pjim.newschool.edu/issues/2011/01/pdfs/ParsonsJournalForInformationMapping_Medler-Ben+Magerko-Brian.pdf
[10] https://cycling74.com/ accessed March 7 2015
[11] http://unity3d.com/5 accessed March 7 2015
[12] http://syphon.v002.info/ accessed March 7 2015
[13] http://threejs.org/ accessed March 7 2015
[14] https://nodejs.org/ accessed March 7 2015
[15] http://mudcu.be/midi-js/ accessed March 7 2015
[16] https://github.com/mohayonao/CoffeeCollider/wiki accessed March 7 2015
[17] http://d3js.org/ accessed March 7 2015
[18] http://puredata.info/ accessed March 7 2015
[19] https://github.com/hagish/kalimba accessed March 7 2015

Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks — 6th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2015

We are pleased to invite you to the

Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks — 6th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2015

taking place at the World Trade Center Zaragoza (WTCZ) in Spain,
on Tuesday, June 2, 2015.

Abstract:
For the sixth time, it is our pleasure to bring together pioneering work in the overlap of the arts, humanities, network research, data science, and information design. The 2015 symposium will again follow our established recipe and will leverage interaction between the areas by means of keynotes, a number of contributions, and a high-profile panel discussion.

In our call, we are looking for a diversity of research contributions revolving around networks in culture, networks in art, networks in the humanities, art about networks, and research in network visualization. Focussing on these five pillars that have crystallized out of our previous meetings, the 2015 symposium again strives to make further impact in the arts, humanities, and natural sciences.

Running parallel to the NetSci2015 conference, the symposium provides a unique opportunity to mingle with leading researchers in complex network science, potentially sparking fruitful collaborations.

As in previous years, selected papers will be published in print, both in a Special Section of Leonardo Journal MIT-Press and in a dedicated Leonardo eBook MIT-Press (see below).

Keynote:
Martin Krzywinski, Scientist, Genome Sciences Center, Vancouver, Canada
Make sure to check out his websites: http://mkweb.bcgsc.ca/ and http://circos.ca/

As in previous years, our high-profile keynote exemplifies the areas of cultural data science, network visualization, and/or network art.

Organizing committee:
Maximilian Schich, Associate Professor, ATEC, The University of Texas at Dallas, USA
Roger Malina, Executive Editor at Leonardo Publications, France/USA
Isabel Meirelles, Professor, Faculty of Design, OCAD University, Toronto, Canada

Submissions:
We invite you to submit a 300 word abstract including one descriptive figure by March 29, 2015 using our EasyChair submission link:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ahcn2015

Note: Our previous calls had an acceptance rate of 14 – 25%. Contributors were selected using a peer review process with three to four independent reviews per paper. Succesful submissions usually include an abstract not exceeding 300 words (plain text in the EasyChair submission form, no paper attachment), a striking figure (.jpg attachment, optimized to about 2000 x 1200 pixel in landscape aspect ratio), as well as an URL, all of which should express the relevance to our call. Previously selected paper topics cover a large territory, including networks in archaeology, art, film, history, music, literature, network visualization, and the culture of art-science. For previous examples see our companion website at ahcncompanion.info.

Important dates:
Deadline for submission: March 29, 2015.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by April 6, 2015.
Date of symposium: Tuesday, June 2, 2015, in Zaragoza, Spain.

Attendance:
Important note: The main NetSci2015 conference requires satellite attendees to pay at least a one day registration fee, in addition to registering to our symposium via EventBrite.

To attend our symposium,
1. Please get a free EventBrite ticket at http://ahcn2015.eventbrite.com/
2. Pay at least a one-day registration fee at http://www.netsci2015.net.

If you do not get an Eventbrite ticket (but you paid the NetSci2015 fee), there is still a chance to attend, as some ticket holders may not be able to show up. We will fill these spaces in Zaragoza, again on a first come, first serve basis. Priority will be given to those on our Eventbrite wait list and those registered for the main NetSci conference.

Program Schedule:

9:00 – Roger Malina: Opening Remarks

9:10 – Maximilian Schich: Introduction

9:30 – Martin Krzywinski: Keynote talk

10:30 – Coffee break

11:00-13:00 – Contributed talks

13:00 – Lunch

14:00-16:00 – Contributed talks

16:00 – Coffee break

16:30 – Panel discussion

17:30 – End


 

About NetSci:
NetSci is the flagship conference on Complex Networks promoted by the NetSci Society. It brings under one umbrella a wide variety of leading researchers, practitioners and stakeholders with direct interest in Network Science, from Physics to Computer Science, Biology, Social Sciences, Economics, Technological and Communication Networks, Big Data and so on.

Links:
eBook on Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks [Kindle Edition]:
Companion website: http://ahcncompanion.info/
For purchase (US $ 7.99): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007S0UA9Q

Special Section in Leonardo Journal:
Leonardo Journal 43:3, June 2010, pp. 212: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/43/3
Leonardo Journal 44:3, June 2011, pp. 239-267: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/44/3
Leonardo Journal 45:1, February 2012, pp. 77-89: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/45/1
Leonardo Journal 45:3, June 2012, pp. 275-286: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/45/3
Leonardo Journal 46:3, June 2013, pp. 267-279: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/46/3
Leonardo Journal 47:3, June 2014, pp. 265-278: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/47/3

Previous Symposia websites:
2010: http://artshumanities.netsci2010.net
2011: http://artshumanities.netsci2011.net
2012: http://artshumanities.netsci2012.net
2013: http://artshumanities.netsci2013.net
2014: http://artshumanities.netsci2014.net

Other relevant sites:
ATEC, The University of Texas at Dallas: http://www.utdallas.edu/atec/
BarabásiLab, Northeastern University, Boston: http://www.barabasilab.com
Faculty of Design, OCAD University, Toronto: http://www.ocadu.ca/academics/faculty-of-design.htm
Leonardo/ISAST: http://www.leonardo.info
NetSci2015: http://www.netsci2015.net


 

Contact:
If you would like to be added to the list of interested people, please drop us an e-mail with the subject [ Please add me to the Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks list ] at artshumanities.netsci@gmail.com. Alternatively you can follow us on Twitter.

Creative Disturbance celebrates its first year by celebrating International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month

Through March, Creative Disturbance is featuring podcasts that showcase women voices in topics of art, science and technology. Some of the more popular podcasts include:

•  Art and Technology Pioneer Liliane Lijn

•  Music, Science and Technology pioneer Pauline Oliveros

•  Internet pioneer and innovator Christine Maxwell’s discussion with educator Rebecca Nix, Why Big Dreamers Need to Know About Big Data.

•  Artist Caroline Ometz‘s scientific and artistic collaborations with UT Southwestern researcher Dhru Deb in Cancer: Finding Beauty in the Beast.

•  Drs. Kathy Ellins and Susan Eriksson address the current status of art and earth science collaborations and new directions that could bolster their utility in geoscience research and education.

..and other topics of interest.

Visit creativedisturbance.org/womensday to hear the talented, powerful and diverse voices, or add your own podcast at the Voices of the Crowd channel to join these more than 25 voices.

Contact us at feedback.createdisturb@gmail.com if you would like to post a podcast!


 

What is Creative Disturbance

Creative Disturbance is an international, multi-lingual, online platform that (once complete) will provide a unique virtual environment for the intellectually curious across the globe to meet, network, collaborate, create, and socialize.

One means of both sharing and spurring such interactions is through a dynamic collection of podcasts crowdsourced and produced by Creative Disturbance members.

These ‘conversations’ help illuminate and inform others on matters of interest across the Creative Disturbance community.

S.T.E.A.M. Power: The Power To Change The World

If you’re looking for more STEAM listening, we recently discovered this podcast over at steampowerpodcast.com that you should check out! From their about page:

“We are a podcast dedicated to bringing you the latest and greatest news stories from across the entire spectrum of Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics; as well as the Maker Movement and various Open Source Initiatives. We seek to inspire the public imagination in S.T.E.A.M. topics thus enabling a society that is technically and scientifically literate. We do this believing that a society that balances technological and scientific pursuit with humanity is the best hope for our collective future.

We also seek to serve as an advocate for the digital rights of individuals. We are strongly committed to ensuring technology plays the role of good in developing and safeguarding the democratic ideals of personal freedom, spirited debate, unfettered elections, and open conversation — free from fear, censorship, and harassment. We will ensure such ideals are passionately defended the world over.

We strive to be an advocate for four core initiatives, they are:

1) STEAM education in the United States and around the world. From elementary school to college and beyond. Not just in the classroom but also within youth groups and in the home.

2) Raising the public awareness and appreciation for the impacts science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics has on our society both now and in the future

3) Evangelizing the Maker Community, Open Source Movement and the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) mentality so that we can become a more creative, self-reliant, and openly collaborative society.

4) Advocating for the digital rights of individuals by ensuring any policies put in place by governments and corporations balance privacy with security. Thus ensuring that the rights and freedoms of the individual is never trumped by corporate greed or government overreach.”

About The Hosts

Mike Parks is an engineer, Navy veteran, and small business owner.  You can follow along on Twitter or Google+, and he occasionally rants on his blog.

Lisa Parks is a sociologist and Mike’s better half.  She is passionate about understanding the impact technology has on people, society, and education.  She is also the creative genius of Super Chic Dollies.

ArtSciLab & Leonardo Initiatives Seeks Experimental Publishing Intern

The ideal candidate is someone who is detail-oriented, enjoys the publishing process, communicates well with others, and is familiar with E-books. The candidate will acquire valuable experience with e-publishing tools and methods. Possible continuation over the summer since most of the work can be done online remotely with coordination meetings held on campus. The work is in the ATEC ArtSciLab under the supervision of professor Roger Malina

Responsibilities:

• Formatting existing or new articles for the upcoming Leonardo E-book according to the current style guide

• Updating style guide and process as it becomes more efficient

• Collaboration with various editors at MIT Press to supplement the development of Leonardo E-books

• Like a liaison with MIT Press, you will communicate and collaborate with E-book editors internationally

• Will help publish the E-book to Amazon

• Support the E-book’s online presence by maintaining its social media

• Responsible for the E-book companion website maintenance

• Could be tasked to experiment with other scholarly publishing platforms (i.e. publishing professional podcasts for the Leonardo Creative Disturbance channel)

Recommended:

• Previous experience in editorial work, social media, and front-end web development

• If interested contact Roger Malina at: roger.malina@utdallas.edu

Carolyne Adhiambo Ojwang Joins ArtSciLab

Carolyne Adhiambo Ojwang was born and raised in Kenya before I relocated to the US to join her family. She is currently a University of Texas at Dallas student in the Masters program in ATEC graduating in Spring, 2015. As an immigrant, she is  interested in the African Diaspora, especially the East African community and how they can use cultural discussions and technological initiatives to provide a gateway to the rest of the world. Her Masters project will address how to enable East Africa to become visible in the global scene as part of the ArtScilab experimental publishing initiatives.

She will be carrying out her masters project in collaboration with the Art Sci Lab Virtual Africa project led by Yvan Tina and contributing to the ArtSciLab Creative Disturbance podcast and collaboration platform.

NEA Grant Awarded to collaboration between University of North Texas xREZ Lab,University of Texas at Dallas ArtSciLab and Texas A and M C Star project for One Antarctic Night

We are thrilled to announce that xREZ lab and collaborators at UTD ArtSciLab and Texas A and M CStar antarctic telescope have received a prestigious NEA art works grant for creation of the interactive artwork Instrument” One Antarctic Night.

http://oneantarcticnight.xrezlab.com/

INSTRUMENT: One Antarctic Night is an interactive artwork created from 287‚800 images of the universe captured recently by a robotic telescope in Antarctica. Using this data about how the universe works‚ we are creating electronic instruments that participants interact with to make digital image and sound remixes. The experience is like a video and music jam session taking place in the gallery‚ on large scale displays‚ mobile devices‚ and online simultaneously.
The project is art+science collaboration between artists and astrophysicist led  by UNT (http://www.xrezlab.com/ ) , with UT Dallas Art SciLab, and Texas A&M (http://mcba11.phys.unsw.edu.au/~plato/cstar.html) with participating artists from RISD and SJSU. Watch the project video and learn more about this exciting artwork at http://oneantarcticnight.xrezlab.com.

ArtScilab collaborators Scot Gresham Lancaster and Brian Merlo and Andrew Blanton at San Jose State University are participating.