Collaborator Kathryn Evans to Defend Doctoral Dissertation

kathryn-evansKathryn Evans is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Art and Technology, with an emphasis on arts education in the 21st century. To that end, she will be presenting her dissertation entitled “Does Studying Music and Sound Design Enhance Academic Abilities in Non-Music Majors: A Phenomenological Approach” on Tuesday, November 8 at 10 am on campus in ATC 1.201.

About Kathryn Evans

Ms. Evans currently holds M. A. degrees in Mathematics and Music from the University of California, San Diego. Evans’ interests include enhancing the cultural environment at the University for students, faculty, staff and the community at large; and creation of an arts curriculum that uses technology to enhance the marketability of students with arts degrees.
A singer, conductor, director and producer of many diverse talents, Ms. Evans has performed and directed music composed from 1200 to contemporary times using a variety of settings and styles. An accomplished recitalist and chamber musician, Ms. Evans has completed tours of music for voice and guitar with fellow faculty member Dr. Enric Madriguera in Austria, Switzerland, the Czech Republic, Mexico, Spain and Latin America.

Ms. Evans is currently the head of the Vocal and Choral division of the School of Arts and Humanities at The University of Texas at Dallas, where she directs the UT Dallas Chamber Singers, teaches vocal instruction, opera theatre workshop and a variety of music history courses.

Ms. Evans was the Associate Dean for the Arts of the School of Arts and Humanities at The University of Texas at Dallas from 1999 to 2010. She was awarded the School of Arts and Humanities Distinguished Service Award in 2010 for her years of service in this position.

Marcel Cage and John Duchamp perform REUNION at Nine Evenings 2 in Seattle

On October 28, 2016 ArtSciLab team members will be performing “Data Stethoscope” brain connectome data in Seattle. Performance is dedicated to celebration of the 50th anniversary of Nine Evenings held in New York by EAT and Bell labs in 1966. 

The performing team includes: artist/musician Scot Gresham Lancaster, Tim Perkis, neuroscientist Gagan Wig and Roger Malina. The project includes also neuroscientists Micaela Chan and Neil Savalia, Art and Technology PhD student Veena Somareddy and the Make or Break gaming company, with Mike Leach and Robert Nally. A truly transdisciplinary, inter-generational, intercultural  team.

The performance will include the FMRI brain Connectome data sets for cohorts of 20, 40, 60, 80 year old. Gagan developed  a team to understand the way brain interconnections evolve with age and experience for healthy adults. The hope is to identify precursor anomalies that may lead to cognitive problems. The software has been developed with the use of data sonification to augment the data visualization of the networks, hence the title ‘data stethoscope”.

Scot Gresham Lancaster, Tim Perkis and Andrew Blanton will be performing three solos, with differing aesthetic approaches to the visualization and sound. At the conclusion of the performance, Scot has designed a chess board interface in homage to John Cage and Marcel Duchamp, who in 1968 performed a celebrated game of chess that triggered sound and music that they titled ”Reunion”.

Detailed story of the piece.

cageduchamp-300x221

Scot has invited Gagan and Roger to be chess performers for this chess performance in homage to John Cage and Marcel Duchamp, hence the meme John Duchamp and Marcel Cage!

To underline the appropriateness of this device, board was practiced by  University of Texas at Dallas Chess Team, which repeatedly wins national and international chess tournaments. Special thanks go out to James Stallings, Director of UTD chess program, and  to International master Zurabi Javakhadze from Georgia, who is ATEC major and member of ArtScience Lab. According to Roger Malina: his father, scientist-artist Frank Malina was an avid chess player and at home, playing chess was often the social platform for art-science technology discussions.

Scot Gresham Lancaster provides this personal recollection:

”Earlier in my career I had the opportunity to work closely with composer/performers John Cage and David Tudor. It was John Cage that connected me with Lowell Cross who designed the photoelectric enabled chess board that was an important part of the “Reunion” electro-acoustically enhanced chess match between Cage and Marcel Duchamp. I received the circuit for this chess board from Mr. Cross and built a working version of the board for a reenactment of the piece for a celebration of Cage’s work at a memorial concert at Mills College in Oakland,CA in 1998. This cemented my interest in using chess play as a source of indeterminacy as a  Post-Cage style musical performance organizing principle.

Fast forward some years later and we are working with the Art/Science lab and the Center for Vital Longevity at UTD and discover that the university has a world class chess program with full scholarships and several World Grand Masters. That program also has a new generation of digital chess boards that can be used to digitally communicate the moves of a chess game in real time. The opportunity arose to use the Art part of our Art/Science collaboration presented itself with an invitation for us to participate in the 50th Anniversary of the historic Engineering Art and Technology (EAT) 9 evenings performance. This time in Seattle and entitled 9E2. This is a wonderful opportunity for us to show our work and dedication to  really fully playing at the Art/Science boundary.

The Artists on the team are seasoned performers with decades of experience but the thought occurred to us that we could integrate the symbolic representation of brain activity, the chess game, as a way to get the scientists on the project directly involved in the performance itself. So while we are using a good part of the evening to directly create music using the tools we have been developing to research by visualizing and sonifying fMRI and EEG data in many different ways. Some of these techniques proved useful for the scientists, but all were created with an idea that they would be part of a human experience and therefore be crafted to bear some artistic interest. By the end of the evening the scientists themselves are driving the form of the visual and sonic interactions directly from the chess moves they are making. The symbolic meeting of the minds driving the multi sensory experience the audience is witnessing.

Special thanks go out to James Stalling of the UTD chess program, of course, the director of the two labs collaborating on this complex and fascinating project, Drs. Roger Malina and Gagan Wig and finally my artistic collaborators Andrew Blanton and Tim Perkis.”

Here is What Malina has to say about the event:

”We are unbearable excited as we countdown for tonight’s performance! I must admit this Art-Science collaboration is one of the most interesting and difficult projects I have been involved in – more difficult than most of the research projects in astrophysics that I have been involved in, for NASA or the European and French Space Agencies! The goal of having an art-science collaboration develop both research software that will help Gagan’s team make scientific discoveries and also the artists perform compelling art is a sweet spot of art-science practice.”

 

Event 9e2 is an art exhibition and performance series commemorating “9 Evenings: Theatre & Engineering,” an iconic exhibition 50 years ago in New York that sparked a new era of collaboration between artists, scientists, and engineers.

Yvan Tina, PhD Student publishes papers in the Technoetic Arts Journal and SciArt Magazine

Yvan Tina is a Phd Student in the School of Arts, Technology and Emerging Communication and member of ArtSciLab. His work investigates the possible convergences of biotechnology, synthetic biology, and artificial life with the performing arts. He is a member of the international, multilingual podcast platform Creative Disturbance where he regularly contributes to Meta–Life and Virtual Africa.

His recent publications include:

1. On Complexism: Pulsion and Computation, Technoetic Arts Journal, Volume 14, Issue 1-2, June 2016

taThis article discusses a concept introduced by art theorist Philip Galanter in several publications over the past decade: complexism is a notion that looks at both past and future while aiming to reconcile (post) modern aesthetics with the cybernetic and biological paradigms. This article focuses on the re-evaluation of the performance arts within the framework of this theory, favoring the idea that every artwork necessarily resists attempts of subordination.

2. Straight Talk with Yvan Tina, SciArt Magazine, April 2016

Untitled

 

In this article Yvan’s insights provide a bridge between the sometimes disparate domains of art and science —a perspective increasingly necessary with the rapid emergence of new materials and technologies available for artistic appropriation.

ArtSciLab Paper by ATEC PhD Candidate Accepted by Union College Symposium on Engineering and Liberal Education

An ArtSciLab paper by Kathryn Evans, Senior Lecturer in Music and ATEC PhD Candidate at UT Dallas, has been accepted for the Union College “Engineering and the Liberal Education” symposium in Schenectedy, NY.

Below is an abstract:


 

“Does studying music enhance higher order learning skills in undergraduate non-music majors?”

Authors:

Kathryn Evans, Senior Lecturer in Music, School of Arts and Humanities, Frank Dufour, Associate Professor, Rosanna Guadagno, Associate Professor and Roger Malina, Professor, Arts and Technology, The University of Texas at Dallas

Abstract:

Many studies have looked at the correlation between music study and academic skills. A review of over 11,000 studies between 1950 and 1990 conducted by Harvard Project Zero tested the claim that studying the arts leads to some form of academic improvement. Only three areas were found that demonstrated a clear causal link between education in an art form and achievement in a non-arts, academic area. Two were in music: a medium-size causal relationship between listening to music and spatial-temporal reasoning and a large causal relationship between learning to make music and spatial-temporal reasoning. (Winner 2001). The majority of these studies have been conducted with students in primary and secondary education, but little research has been done on students at the undergraduate college level who study music, either as a minor or for general interest. Most pedagogical studies in music address the needs of music majors and not non-majors.

This pilot study looked at students at the University of Texas at Dallas who enrolled in music studies (either music performance, music theory or sound design) who are not majoring in music. Many are students in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) areas. Through phenomenological research methods, we looked at the experiences of students who study music or sound design and how they perceived it affects their academic skills in other areas. Emails for students currently enrolled in music or sound design courses in AY2014-15 were obtained from registration records and they were solicited to take an on-line survey, with an option to volunteer for an in-depth interview. Over 800 students were solicited in February 2015 and a response rate of 20% has already been obtained. Additionally, over 30 students have volunteered for the interview. Initial data and a preliminary analysis will be presented.

Jack Ox Joins ArtSciLab as a Research Fellow!

Jack Ox is an artist who used research as the method behind her art works and is now taking the procedures developed as an artist to the scientific and engineering world of visualization. She is also a longtime member of Leonardo Journal’s editorial board, and has served as both a Research Assistant Professor in Art and Art History, and Research Associate Professor of Music at the University of New Mexico; also at UNM, she is a researcher at the Center for Advanced Computing (CARC). Ox just finished a PhD dissertation on “Manifestations of Conceptual Metaphor and Blending Theories” for Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne. Her 30-year career of mapping musical scores to paintings such as Kurt Schwitters’s intermedia masterpiece, “Ursonate,” can be seen at http://www.jackox.net/pages/Ursonate/ur_MAINindex.html and virtual reality renditions, such as the “Gridjam” at http://www.jackox.net/pages/gridjamIndex.html. Recently, Ox presented a paper at the IEEE VIS 2014 conference in Paris on how knowledge representers can use analogy and conceptual blending in visualizations.

Jack Ox, together with Fluxus artist Ken Friedman, is leading the 3-year Leonardo symposium on the PhD in Art and Design. This project is documenting best methods and practices, as well as issues and challenges, that are emerging with the introduction of the PhD in Art and Design in universities internationally and in particular for hybrid professionals in theh art-science and art-technology fields.

The UT Dallas ArtSci Lab is pleased to welcome Guy Edmonds as an affiliate research fellow

The UT Dallas ArtSci Lab is pleased to welcome Guy Edmonds as an affiliate
research fellow. Roger Malina is serving on Guy Edmonds’ PhD Committee
in the Cognovo
consortium on cognitive innovation ( www.cognovo.eu) at the University
of Plymouth. His PhD topic is on
Early Cinema and Cognitive Creativity. The committee is chaired by
Professor Michael Punt head of
the Transtechnology Research project: http://trans-techresearch.net/.
The ArtSciLab and the
Transtech program have a series of ongoing collaborations.

Guy Edmonds Project: Early cinema and Cognitive Creativity

An interdisciplinary investigation of the cognitive impact of analogue
and digital film projection technologies.

http://www.cognovo.eu/people/research-fellows/guy-edmonds.php

Background

Guy Edmonds is a film maker and professional film restorer and archivist who has
previously worked at The Cinema Museum in London, Christie’s Camera
and Photographic auctions, and the EYE Film Institute (formerly
Nederlands Filmmuseum).

His research interests in early cinema and home movies have led to two
unique programming events in which new contexts are proposed for found
films – The Séance du Cinema performances where spiritualistic mediums
attempt to divine further information about the unknown protagonists
of found home movies and the Saloon of Refuse in which a wide variety
of often fragmentary film forms are saved from landfill for last
chance saloon screenings.

His writings on the subject of Home Movies and Amateur film have
appeared in specialised edited volumes, the academic journal, Film
History, the monthly film magazine, Skrien, and the Stichting
Amateurfilm magazine and website.

He organised the first Home Movie Days in London and since 2008 has
been a co-organiser of the Home Movie Days at EYE in Amsterdam. He is
a member of the artist-run cooperative, Filmwerkplaats in Rotterdam,
and a performer with the Projector Orchestra.

2014 Fourth International CDASH Call

2014 FOURTH INTERNATIONAL CDASH CALL FOR INTER-DISCIPLINARY
ART-SCIENCE-HUMANITIES CURRICULA- Deadline JULY 30 2014

CDASH : Curriculum Development in the Arts, Sciences and Humanities

http://www.utdallas.edu/atec/cdash/

Leonardo Executive Editor Roger Malina and UT Dallas faculty member
Kathryn Evans are inventorying examples of courses and curricula that
are in the art-science–humanities field such as courses on art and
biology, music and mathematics, art and chemistry, dance and
environmental sciences, etc.

The current CDASH inventory is available at
http://www.utdallas.edu/atec/cdash/  includes over 130 courses.

Individuals who have taught an art-science-humanities course at the
university or secondary-school level, in formal or informal settings,
are invited to contact Kathryn Evans, with details of their
curriculum, at kcevans@utdallas.edu.  Please send the URL (if
available), title and number of the course(s), a short description,
the level offered (graduate or undergraduate) and the department(s) in
which the course(s) was offered.  We are also interested in the
“history” of your course – when it was offered, if you had any issues
with approval, and how you developed the course, lessons learned. Full
syllabi may be sent to Paul Thomas at  p.thomas@unsw.edu.au to be
included in a cloud wiki at http://artsci.unsw.wikispaces.net/.

We are interested in the broad range of all forms of the performing
arts (including music, dance, theatre and film) and the visual arts
(both traditional and new media); and connecting to all the sciences.
We are looking for submissions of in-person class room, on-line and
hybrid blended courses. We also include technology related courses
that are art-science focused.

The CDASH site also lists programs and centers that are devoted to
Art- Science-Humanities research and curriculum.

This project is overseen by a working group consisting of: Kathryn
Evans, UT Dallas, Roger F Malina, UT Dallas, Paul Thomas, University
of New South Wales, Meredith Tromble, San Francisco Art Institute and
the Leonardo LEAF Chair David Familian, University of California,
Irvine.

This project is co sponsored by Leonardo Education and Art Forum
(LEAF): http://www.leonardo.info/isast/LEAF.html; The ArtSciLab,
University of Texas at Dallas (UTD): http://artscilab.utdallas.edu/
and the  College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales (UNSW)
http://www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/.

We also bring your attention to the call for MA and PhD Thesis
abstracts in Art, Science and Technology:
http://leonardolabs.pomona.edu/

The Leonardo Abstracts Service (LABS) is a comprehensive database of
Ph.D., Masters and MFA thesis abstracts on the intersection of art,
science and technology. Individuals receiving advanced degrees in
disciplines that investigate philosophical, historical or critical
applications of science or technology to the arts are invited to
submit abstracts of their theses for consideration. Selected abstracts
are published in Leonardo Electronic Almanac. Authors of most highly
ranked abstracts are invited to submit an article for publication in
Leonardo. The aim of the LABS database is to give visibility to
interdisciplinary work. Annual submission deadline: 30 June. For more
information, contact Sheila Pinkel at <spinkel@earthlink.net>.

Dr. Maximilian Schich joins ArtSciLab

ArtSciLab collaborator Dr. Maximilian Schich has joined the University of Texas at Dallas as an associate professor for the Arts and Technology program. Schich is working to understand the complex system of cultural history through the convergence of art history, information visualization, physics, and computer science.

Through examining massive amounts of data, Schich searches for patterns not readily visible in culture. As a continuation of his post-doctoral project, he works of modeling and simulation of the intricate networks within the arts and humanities with Dr. Dirk Helbing, chair of sociology at ETH Zurich, and Albert-László Barabási, Center for Complex Network Research at Northeastern University in Boston. Schich received funding for this research as a DFG research fellow from the Special Innovation Fund of the President of Max-Planck-Society.

Schich’s background is entrenched in both art and science. Schich received his PhD in art history from Humboldt-University in Berlin and a masters in in art history, classical archaeology and psychology from Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich. Schich has over a decade of consulting experience with graph data and complex research projects.

Schich is an editorial advisor at Leonardo journal and is the organizing chair of the ongoing NetSci symposia series on arts, humanities and complex networks.

Source: UT Dallas News Center