Announcing STEM to STEAM graduate seminar for Fall 2016, ATEC UT Dallas.

ATEC 6380. 501 STEM to STEAM.

Contact roger.malina@utdallas.edu for info and approval to enroll.

Fall 2016 Instructor: Professor Roger Malina. Classes will be held on Monday Evenings.

This seminar will be co-taught with modules led by Dr. Paul Fishwick, Dr. Eun Ah Lee and Professor Kathryn Evans.

Course description: The seminar is open to PhD, MA and MFA students. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum).

Syllabus is designed around the research or creative projects of each student.

This course will study current and emerging topics, approaches, and practices, where arts, sciences, and humanities interact or converge, with the goal to advance new research questions and areas of inquiry.

The integration of the arts, humanities and design into Science, Technology, Engineering and Math has become an important research and education agenda in the US and internationally. In this seminar each student will work with the instructor and/or other students on topics in science and engineering that are part of their ATEC or EMAC PhD, MA or MFA project of interest.

The syllabus will be modified to discuss topic areas of each student. Deliverables from each student for the seminar will be defined individually so that each student makes significant progress on their own project. TOPICS Guest lecturers will include visitors to ATEC and also online guests proposed by the students. Topics and readings will include the following topics, with others to be added responding to student areas of interest: The ethics of curiosity, Readings from the work of Indian philosopher of science Sundar Sarukkai, Foundations of inter and transdisciplinary research with readings from the work of Allen Repko, The science of collaboration, readings around the methodologies used to develop successful collaboration strategies when the work bridges the arts, sciences and humanities, Key readings from the Science of Team science initiative, anthropologist James Leach and other experts on training collaboration techniques.

Required reading will be the NSF funded study led by Dr. Malina on enabling new forms of collaboration between the arts and humanities with science and engineering. How researchers and artists can use developing techniques in cultural analytics, data visualization and representation, data Science. How digital humanities are enabling new research questions and methods. Data immersion and exploration. Performing data. Contemporary initiatives in cognitive sciences and neurobiology that can inform research and creative practices. Innovations in scholarly and art publishing and education. How researchers and artists document their work and present to different audiences today. The history and current practices of inter, multi and transdisciplinary research including recent work on the second wave of “consilience’ or emerging practices to succeed in ‘vertical integration’ of the sciences/engineering with arts/design/humanities. Research in arts and design.

We will look at how international programs are developing research methodologies in arts and design and emerging best practices. Development of rationales for art-science and art-technology in society in the USA and Europe. History and trends in design education. Creative industries today. Citizen science, collaborative science and open science developments today.

Deliverables Students will be expected to use social media and new forms of professional documentation such as video abstracts, podcasts, an online research web site or blog. Each student will record a podcast discussing their work to be published on the Leonardo Creative Disturbance podcast platform at MIT Press. Strategies for public engagement. Funding is available for student presentations at local events and conferences. Students who wish to enroll are encouraged to contact the instructor at roger.malina@utdallas.edu. So that, the syllabus can be augmented in areas of specific interest or need of the student.

Grading will be based 10% on attendance, 45% on participation and presentations made during the semester and 45% on the final deliverable. The final deliverable for the end of the semester is intended to help each student work and advance their ATEC or EMAC PhD, MA or MFA project or interest. Format of the deliverable will be determined by the student in consultation with the instructor.

 

 

 

 

Roger Malina talks about Sciences and New Technologies in CAP 2016 Colombia

CAP 2016 logo

Many of the world’s top astronomy communicators met in Medellin, Colombia in May to exchange views and experiences during the five-day ‘’Communicating Astronomy with the Public 2016’’ Conference.

Organized by International Astronomical Union (IAU) Commission C2, CAP is the largest event of its kind and continues a series of international gatherings held roughly every two years since 2002. It was the first CAP conference in South America.

Professional communicators, research astronomers, press officers, science journalists and facilitators covered 30 different topics, mostly concentrated on how to best bring Astronomy closer to people and engage different audiences with Science and Technology.

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Roger Malina’s keynote talk put main emphasis on Crossfertilizing the Arts, in retrospect of Sciences and New Technologies. The talk also included wide range of topics like: STEM and STEAM practices, astrophysics, and data visualization.

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Bridging the Silos: Curriculum Development as a Tool for Crossing Disciplines in the Arts, Sciences and Humanities

To be published in the Leonardo Electronic Almanac Special Issue:  The Culture of Digital Education

Abstract
A survey of current cross-disciplinary offerings in higher education is needed to understand the mechanisms that were employed to offer them and their pedagogical basis. We present here a study that analyzes a compendium of arts-science-humanities cross-disciplinary courses that was created through several Calls for Contributions from 2009 to 2013.

A web site was created and over 100 submissions were posted at utdallas.edu/atec/cdash/ . The data from the courses was analyzed as to the nature of the cross-disciplines, level of offering (graduate vs. undergraduate), geographical location, level of collaboration (number of instructors), and the department(s) offering the course.

A comprehensive re-visioning of curricular structure to encourage collaborative teaching of integrative courses and programs is needed. Suggested actions include specific ideas to enhance networking and visibility, sharing of syllabi and course materials, and a research effort to demonstrate the effectiveness of cross-disciplinary art-science-humanities courses.

This preliminary study points the way towards further efforts in curricular design and research that will be required for cross-disciplinary arts-science-humanities courses to be integrated into the college curriculum.

View the full paper here

Kathryn Evans, Senior Lecturer in Music, School of Arts and Humanities,
kcevans@utdallas.edu
website

Roger Malina, Professor and Associate Director, Arts and Technology (ATEC), and CNRS Aix-Marseille University. School of Arts and Humanities,
roger.malina@utdallas.edu
website

Cassini Nazir Appointed as Director of Design and Research

Cassini Nazir, an assistant professor of interaction design at UT Dallas, has been appointed as Director of Design and Research for the ArtSciLab in the Arts and Technology program.

At UT Dallas, Cassini teaches classes in interaction design, web design and design principles. He is also academic head for the burgeoning Interaction Design track in the Arts and Technology program.

With Roger Malina, executive editor of the Leonardo journal, Cassini is currently managing Creative Disturbance, an international, multilingual network and podcast platform supporting collaboration among the arts, science, and technology communities.

In recent years, Cassini has worked closely with Big Design Conference founder Brian Sullivan to create opportunities for UT Dallas students to help organize the yearly conference that brings in over 1,000 design professionals from across the nation.

Over the past 17 years, Cassini has designed print pieces, logos, websites, and interactive experiences for mobile, tablet and desktop devices. Cassini holds an MFA from UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology Program and bachelors degrees in English literature and Economics.

ArtSciLab Paper and Performance Proposal Accepted for International Computer Music Conference

Scot Gresham-Lancaster,  a UT Dallas ATEC associate professor of sound design, has composed a piece and paper, “Culture of Fire” for Analog Neural Network Synthesizer, Geiger Muller Counters and Computer, which have been accepted for the  41st International Computer Music Conference hosted at the University of North Texas in Denton. The ICMC will take place September 25th to October 1st, 2015.

Below is an abstract:

“Culture of Fire” for Analog Neural Network Synthesizer, Geiger Muller Counters and Computer

Author:

Scot Gresham-Lancaster, UT Dallas

Abstract:

The “Culture of Fire” is an ongoing live performance piece constructed of residue from a project that was started by David Tudor and others to turn INTEL’s now defunct Electronically Trainable Analog Neural Net (ETANN) into a music synthesizer. A secondary layer of “control” in the live performance of the piece is that Geiger Muller Tube triggers are used as the source of actuation and location distribution of sonic events.

ArtSciLab Director serving on Editorial Board for New Open Journal On_Culture

Roger Malina, the Director of the ArtSciLab, has agreed to serve on the Editorial Board for the new journal On_Culture: Open Journal for the Study of Culture, published from the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture (GCSC) in Giessen, Germany.

On_Culture is an open access e-journal, with a focus on transparency and openness as well as reflexivity and processes of metaization in dealing with concepts in the study of culture.The “open” aspect of On_Culture refers to a particular publishing mode, but the goal of the journal will be to develop alternative visions of how culture can be understood, studied, and promoted using new research methodologies that draw on emerging sciences. The journal will host a wide range of formats and modes of presentation, including peer-reviewed scholarly articles and review essays as well as artistic and experimental contributions.

On_Culture is presenting a call for abstracts for the first issue, which will offer perspectives on Emergence/Emergency as concepts in the study of culture.


 

On Emergence/Emergency, from On_Culture:

Emergence is a key term in the study of culture. It is both a structuring principle of academic research and an object of study. It serves as a conceptual nucleus of knowledge cultures and academic approaches that call mono-causal, reductionist explanations and determinstic accounts of complex phenomena and practices into question. With its connotations of creative energies being set free through emergent processes and phenomena, emergence is a marker of novelty, unpredictability and irreducibility.

Emergency indicates a state, or degree of severity, requiring immediate attention and intervention. States of emergency are often emergent phenomena, and their roots can lie far into the historical, ecological, financial, social and cultural pasts. Many emerging topics in the study of culture (e.g., migration, climate change, demographic change, financial crisis, rightwing/left-wing politics, digitization, globalization, social injustice, precarious working conditions) address ‘emergent emergencies.’

We have paired the concepts of emergence/emergency to highlight the degree of urgency with which much research on the phenomenon of emergence and emergent phenomena is conducted. Both terms call for self-reflexivity and cautious intervention in the cultural analysis of processes of transformation. Instances of the interfacing of emergence and emergency are urgent tasks that scholars in the study of culture need to tackle with the help of new approaches.

Possible questions to be reflected upon:

– Why is a specific object of study an emergent phenomenon? How can it be
explained with the help of a particular theory, or theories, of emergence?

– How has emergence been theorized within a specific discipline and/or across
disciplines?

– How have concepts of emergence evolved over time? What cultural and
historical circumstances have affected their expression?

More details can be found on the On_Culture call for abstracts.

If you are interested in having a peer reviewed academic article featured in the pilot issue, please submit an abstract of 200 words with the article title and a short biographical note to content@on-culture.org no later than 30 September 2015 with the subject line “Abstract Submission.” You will be notified by 15 October 2015 whether your paper proposal has been accepted. The deadline for submitting the final paper is 15 January 2016.

Please note: On_Culture also features a section devoted to shorter, creative pieces pertaining to each issue topic. These can be interviews, essays, opinion pieces, reviews of exhibitions, analyses of cultural artifacts and events, photo galleries, videos, works of art, and more. These contributions are uploaded on a rolling basis.

Roger Malina appointed to board of advisors for Sristhi Institute for Art, Design and Technology in India

Roger Malina was recently appointed to the international board of advisors for the Sristhi Institute for Art, Design and Technology in Bangalore, India, whose founding director is friend and colleague Geetha Narayanan. Geetha is an educator with over four decades of experience as a teacher, an educator, a curriculum and instruction designer. At all times a catalyst, Dr. Narayanan has tried over the years to evolve paradigms of learning that integrate the mind, body and consciousness and in the last few years has worked at creating collaborative pedagogical frameworks for the teaching of mathematics, science and languages within the Indian educational system at the informal and formal levels of schooling.

In particular, Dr. Malina will be helping with the new PhD program in Art and Design at Srishti, which is a recognized research center of Manipal University. Six scholars joined the PhD program in 2014, and nine more scholars from India and abroad are expected to join the program in 2015.

The advisors for the program are an interesting cross-section of the international art, design, and technology-practicing community. They include:

Joichi Ito, who is the Director of the MIT Media Lab and the Chairman of the Board of PureTech Health. He is also on the Board of Sony Corporation, The New York Times Company, The MacArthur Foundation, The Knight Foundation, and The Mozilla Foundation and the co-founder and board member of Digital Garage. He is a member of the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Center of Innovation (COI) STREAM governance committee.

Brandon Gien, who is the CEO of Good Design Australia and current President of the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design (ICSID), the world organization for Industrial Design. Through his work with ICSID, he co-founded the World Design Impact Prize to honor design-driven projects that make a positive impact on our social, economic, cultural and environmental quality of life.

Ezio Manzini, who has been working in the field of design for sustainability. Most recently, his interests have focused on social innovation, considered a major driver of sustainable changes. With this perspective, he started DESIS: an international network of schools of design specifically active in the field of design for social innovation and sustainability.

John Newbigin, who is Chairman of Creative England and of Cinema Arts Network. As Special Advisor to the Minister for Culture, Rt Hon Chris Smith MP, he was closely involved in developing the UK government’s first policies for the creative industries in the 1990s. He was Head of Corporate Relations for Channel 4 Television and executive assistant to Lord Puttnam as the Chairman of the film company Enigma Productions Ltd. As a policy advisor to the Leader of the Labour Party and Leader of the Opposition, Rt Hon Neil Kinnock, MP, he had responsibility for environmental and cultural issues, amongst others.

Soon-In Lee, who has been a graduate school lecturer in design management. He was also Dean of International Design School for Advanced Studies of Hong-ik University. Soon-In Lee was President (2011-2013) of the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design (ICSID), Chair of the Korea Design & Brand Management Society, and General director for Gwangju Design Biennale 2007. Since 2003, he has been the Chair of Asia Design Network and Korea 3D Printing Culture Forum. At present, Soon-In Lee is Executive Managing Director of Seoul Design Center.

Performed Data from One Antarctic Night to be featured in soundtrack for BBC’s Sound of Space

Sounds from One Antarctic Night, a series of interactive artworks created from 287,800 images of the night sky, are to be featured in the soundtrack for the BBC World Service series The Sound of Space.

One Antarctic Night, led by a creative team including Ruth West, Roger Malina, Lifan Wang, Scot Gresham-Lancaster, Alejandro Borsani, Andrew Blanton, and Brian Merlo, used data from the robotic telescope CSTAR in Antarctica and created electronic instruments that participants could interact with to make digital image and sound remixes. The resulting project sought to blend art and science in new ways, and has been featured in venues including the San Francisco Exploratorium, the New York Hall of Science, and the Rubin Center.

The Sound of Space, which features a tour of the Universe using audio that has either been recorded by probes such as Cassini-Huygens, or sonified from data gathered by spacecraft and telescopes, will have a soundtrack that includes artworks inspired by space. The soundtrack will include 5 sonifications from One Antarctic Night, including Deep Choir and White Noise Universe. Other audio in the soundtrack will include works from Caroline Devine, Louis Dandrel, Radioqualia, Sigur Ros and Semiconductor.

This project can be found under the ArtSciLab Projects page for more details.

ArtSciLab Paper by ATEC PhD Candidate Accepted by Union College Symposium on Engineering and Liberal Education

An ArtSciLab paper by Kathryn Evans, Senior Lecturer in Music and ATEC PhD Candidate at UT Dallas, has been accepted for the Union College “Engineering and the Liberal Education” symposium in Schenectedy, NY.

Below is an abstract:


 

“Does studying music enhance higher order learning skills in undergraduate non-music majors?”

Authors:

Kathryn Evans, Senior Lecturer in Music, School of Arts and Humanities, Frank Dufour, Associate Professor, Rosanna Guadagno, Associate Professor and Roger Malina, Professor, Arts and Technology, The University of Texas at Dallas

Abstract:

Many studies have looked at the correlation between music study and academic skills. A review of over 11,000 studies between 1950 and 1990 conducted by Harvard Project Zero tested the claim that studying the arts leads to some form of academic improvement. Only three areas were found that demonstrated a clear causal link between education in an art form and achievement in a non-arts, academic area. Two were in music: a medium-size causal relationship between listening to music and spatial-temporal reasoning and a large causal relationship between learning to make music and spatial-temporal reasoning. (Winner 2001). The majority of these studies have been conducted with students in primary and secondary education, but little research has been done on students at the undergraduate college level who study music, either as a minor or for general interest. Most pedagogical studies in music address the needs of music majors and not non-majors.

This pilot study looked at students at the University of Texas at Dallas who enrolled in music studies (either music performance, music theory or sound design) who are not majoring in music. Many are students in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) areas. Through phenomenological research methods, we looked at the experiences of students who study music or sound design and how they perceived it affects their academic skills in other areas. Emails for students currently enrolled in music or sound design courses in AY2014-15 were obtained from registration records and they were solicited to take an on-line survey, with an option to volunteer for an in-depth interview. Over 800 students were solicited in February 2015 and a response rate of 20% has already been obtained. Additionally, over 30 students have volunteered for the interview. Initial data and a preliminary analysis will be presented.

DataRemix Paper Live on Leonardo Just Accepted Page

“DataRemix: Designing the Datamade,”is now on the Leonardo Just Accepted page, hosted by MIT Press. The paper was a part of the Special Section of Leonardo Transactions “Highlights from VISAP’13”, and was previously announced by the ArtSciLab as presented at the 2013 IEEE VIS Arts Program (VISAP) in Atlanta, Georgia. The authors of the paper were Ruth West, Roger Malina, John Lewis, Scot Gresham-Lancaster, Alejandro Borsani, Brian Merlo, and Lifan Wang.

The full paper can be downloaded here: DataRemix: Designing The Data made Through ArtScience Collaboration

The article is forthcoming in the Leonardo print publication, and can be cited with the DOI: 10.1162/LEON_a_01060.