Clark Scholars Boost Research Skills Through Summer Program

Twenty-four UT Dallas students, most of them freshmen, got a head start on their undergraduate experiences by spending nine weeks this summer conducting research on campus.

The Anson L. Clark Summer Research Program, coordinated by the Office of Undergraduate Education, saw projects ranging from the development of prosthetic casings to the design of “smart” agricultural systems. Students recently displayed their research results during a poster presentation and symposium. Incoming UT Dallas students who have been awarded Academic Excellence Scholarships are eligible to apply to be Clark Scholars. No previous research experience is necessary.

“Every year I’m amazed at how these students progress in nine short weeks, both socially and in their grasp of advanced research methods,” said Courtney Brecheen, associate dean in the Office of Undergraduate Education. “For many, participation in this program is their first chance to socialize with other university students and become acclimated to campus. It doesn’t take long before they really come together as a group, and by the end of the summer, they have mastered the art of articulating complex research to a general audience.”

The 2016 class of Clark Scholars collaborated with mentors in School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication (ATEC), the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science. Nearly all of the students intend to continue their research with their mentors’ lab groups during the upcoming year, Brecheen said.

Dr. Paul Pantano, associate professor of chemistry and past recipient of the Provost’s Award for Faculty Excellence in Undergraduate Research Mentoring, serves as the program’s scientific adviser.

Among the participants was Joel Ewing, a first-year ATEC student, who worked with Cassini Nazir, ATEC professor and director of design and research of ArtSciLab, and Dr.Roger Malina  Distinguished Professor of Arts and Technology, to design a website. ARTECA — a collaboration between UT Dallas’ ArtSciLab, which Malina directs, and the MIT Press — will be an online curated space of essential content in an interdisciplinary field where art, science and technology meet.

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ATEC student Joel Ewing helped design a website that aggregates scholarly content in an interdisciplinary field that combines art, science and technology. Dr. Roger Malina, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Technology, was his faculty mentor.

 

“The problem was, there was no central place to access materials related to this field,” Ewing said. “When ARTECA is launched, UT Dallas students will have free access to it, and other universities can subscribe. My role as a designer was to look for and address issues that affect user experience.”

Hannah Barber, a first-year student in biomedical engineering who led a collaborative project with ATEC students to design and produce decorative casings for lower limb prosthetics. She worked with faculty mentor Dr. Robert Gregg, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and bioengineering, along with students of Andrew Scott, associate professor of arts and technology.

Computer science students Daniel Garcia and Christopher Janusa spent the summer working together to develop “smart” electronics for agriculture applications. Their faculty mentor was Dr. Subbarayan Venkatesan, professor of computer science.

“There is a need for agriculture systems that are automated, simple to use and configurable,” Garcia said. “This could include systems like automated irrigation and temperature control.”

The students envisioned a smart system that includes sensors and actuators that monitor, for example, temperature and soil moisture, and could be integrated with weather data to automatically adjust irrigation and other actions according to the forecast. Users could use a web interface to regulate the system, Garcia said.

The Clark Summer Research Program is funded by an endowment from the Clark Foundation, whose philanthropy has supported scholarly endeavors at several Texas colleges and universities, such as the Anson L. Clark Memorial Lecture and the Dr. Anson L. Clark Presidential Scholarship at UT Dallas.

Creative Disturbance at ISEA

isea-main

Director of Design and Research for the ArtSciLab Cassini Nazir recently presented at the 22nd International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA), which was held in Hong Kong.

Talking on a panel titled “Creative Work and Well-Being,” Nazir discussed technical and design challenges for nurturing crowd sourced conversations on the Creative Disturbance platform. He outlined innovative methods in design, development and production for the podcast series.

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“Creative Disturbance is a platform developed in response to the need for a rupture in the arcane networks that currently connect creative people,” Nazir said. “We’re reaching an international, multilingual network and facilitating collaboration among the arts, sciences, and new technologies communities.”

Creative Disturbance celebrates its third year and at the time of the conference features 65 hours of content in ten languages, with over 270 contributors.

Creative Disturbance was one among many projects from UT Dallas faculty accepted into ISEA 2016:

  •  a robot that sleepwalks and Error as Armor. Data Obfuscation in the Yakamoto Industries Project, Dean Terry
  •  Vigil for Some Bodies, xtine burrough
  •  AIDS Quilt Touch Project, Anne Balsamo and Dale MacDonald

Founded in the Netherlands in 1990, ISEA International (formerly Inter-Society for the Electronic Arts) is an international non-profit organization fostering interdisciplinary academic discourse and exchange among culturally diverse organizations and individuals working with art, science and technology.

Over seven days, more than 450 speakers, workshops and presentations explored the theme of “Cultural Revolution,” investigating the borders between academia and artwork, practice and theory, systems and reality, and art and society.

Roger Malina talks about Sciences and New Technologies in CAP 2016 Colombia

CAP 2016 logo

Many of the world’s top astronomy communicators met in Medellin, Colombia in May to exchange views and experiences during the five-day ‘’Communicating Astronomy with the Public 2016’’ Conference.

Organized by International Astronomical Union (IAU) Commission C2, CAP is the largest event of its kind and continues a series of international gatherings held roughly every two years since 2002. It was the first CAP conference in South America.

Professional communicators, research astronomers, press officers, science journalists and facilitators covered 30 different topics, mostly concentrated on how to best bring Astronomy closer to people and engage different audiences with Science and Technology.

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Roger Malina’s keynote talk put main emphasis on Crossfertilizing the Arts, in retrospect of Sciences and New Technologies. The talk also included wide range of topics like: STEM and STEAM practices, astrophysics, and data visualization.

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Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks — 6th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2015

We are pleased to invite you to the

Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks — 6th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2015

taking place at the World Trade Center Zaragoza (WTCZ) in Spain,
on Tuesday, June 2, 2015.

Abstract:
For the sixth time, it is our pleasure to bring together pioneering work in the overlap of the arts, humanities, network research, data science, and information design. The 2015 symposium will again follow our established recipe and will leverage interaction between the areas by means of keynotes, a number of contributions, and a high-profile panel discussion.

In our call, we are looking for a diversity of research contributions revolving around networks in culture, networks in art, networks in the humanities, art about networks, and research in network visualization. Focussing on these five pillars that have crystallized out of our previous meetings, the 2015 symposium again strives to make further impact in the arts, humanities, and natural sciences.

Running parallel to the NetSci2015 conference, the symposium provides a unique opportunity to mingle with leading researchers in complex network science, potentially sparking fruitful collaborations.

As in previous years, selected papers will be published in print, both in a Special Section of Leonardo Journal MIT-Press and in a dedicated Leonardo eBook MIT-Press (see below).

Keynote:
Martin Krzywinski, Scientist, Genome Sciences Center, Vancouver, Canada
Make sure to check out his websites: http://mkweb.bcgsc.ca/ and http://circos.ca/

As in previous years, our high-profile keynote exemplifies the areas of cultural data science, network visualization, and/or network art.

Organizing committee:
Maximilian Schich, Associate Professor, ATEC, The University of Texas at Dallas, USA
Roger Malina, Executive Editor at Leonardo Publications, France/USA
Isabel Meirelles, Professor, Faculty of Design, OCAD University, Toronto, Canada

Submissions:
We invite you to submit a 300 word abstract including one descriptive figure by March 29, 2015 using our EasyChair submission link:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ahcn2015

Note: Our previous calls had an acceptance rate of 14 – 25%. Contributors were selected using a peer review process with three to four independent reviews per paper. Succesful submissions usually include an abstract not exceeding 300 words (plain text in the EasyChair submission form, no paper attachment), a striking figure (.jpg attachment, optimized to about 2000 x 1200 pixel in landscape aspect ratio), as well as an URL, all of which should express the relevance to our call. Previously selected paper topics cover a large territory, including networks in archaeology, art, film, history, music, literature, network visualization, and the culture of art-science. For previous examples see our companion website at ahcncompanion.info.

Important dates:
Deadline for submission: March 29, 2015.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by April 6, 2015.
Date of symposium: Tuesday, June 2, 2015, in Zaragoza, Spain.

Attendance:
Important note: The main NetSci2015 conference requires satellite attendees to pay at least a one day registration fee, in addition to registering to our symposium via EventBrite.

To attend our symposium,
1. Please get a free EventBrite ticket at http://ahcn2015.eventbrite.com/
2. Pay at least a one-day registration fee at http://www.netsci2015.net.

If you do not get an Eventbrite ticket (but you paid the NetSci2015 fee), there is still a chance to attend, as some ticket holders may not be able to show up. We will fill these spaces in Zaragoza, again on a first come, first serve basis. Priority will be given to those on our Eventbrite wait list and those registered for the main NetSci conference.

Program Schedule:

9:00 – Roger Malina: Opening Remarks

9:10 – Maximilian Schich: Introduction

9:30 – Martin Krzywinski: Keynote talk

10:30 – Coffee break

11:00-13:00 – Contributed talks

13:00 – Lunch

14:00-16:00 – Contributed talks

16:00 – Coffee break

16:30 – Panel discussion

17:30 – End


 

About NetSci:
NetSci is the flagship conference on Complex Networks promoted by the NetSci Society. It brings under one umbrella a wide variety of leading researchers, practitioners and stakeholders with direct interest in Network Science, from Physics to Computer Science, Biology, Social Sciences, Economics, Technological and Communication Networks, Big Data and so on.

Links:
eBook on Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks [Kindle Edition]:
Companion website: http://ahcncompanion.info/
For purchase (US $ 7.99): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007S0UA9Q

Special Section in Leonardo Journal:
Leonardo Journal 43:3, June 2010, pp. 212: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/43/3
Leonardo Journal 44:3, June 2011, pp. 239-267: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/44/3
Leonardo Journal 45:1, February 2012, pp. 77-89: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/45/1
Leonardo Journal 45:3, June 2012, pp. 275-286: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/45/3
Leonardo Journal 46:3, June 2013, pp. 267-279: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/46/3
Leonardo Journal 47:3, June 2014, pp. 265-278: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/47/3

Previous Symposia websites:
2010: http://artshumanities.netsci2010.net
2011: http://artshumanities.netsci2011.net
2012: http://artshumanities.netsci2012.net
2013: http://artshumanities.netsci2013.net
2014: http://artshumanities.netsci2014.net

Other relevant sites:
ATEC, The University of Texas at Dallas: http://www.utdallas.edu/atec/
BarabásiLab, Northeastern University, Boston: http://www.barabasilab.com
Faculty of Design, OCAD University, Toronto: http://www.ocadu.ca/academics/faculty-of-design.htm
Leonardo/ISAST: http://www.leonardo.info
NetSci2015: http://www.netsci2015.net


 

Contact:
If you would like to be added to the list of interested people, please drop us an e-mail with the subject [ Please add me to the Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks list ] at artshumanities.netsci@gmail.com. Alternatively you can follow us on Twitter.

Creative Disturbance celebrates its first year by celebrating International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month

Through March, Creative Disturbance is featuring podcasts that showcase women voices in topics of art, science and technology. Some of the more popular podcasts include:

•  Art and Technology Pioneer Liliane Lijn

•  Music, Science and Technology pioneer Pauline Oliveros

•  Internet pioneer and innovator Christine Maxwell’s discussion with educator Rebecca Nix, Why Big Dreamers Need to Know About Big Data.

•  Artist Caroline Ometz‘s scientific and artistic collaborations with UT Southwestern researcher Dhru Deb in Cancer: Finding Beauty in the Beast.

•  Drs. Kathy Ellins and Susan Eriksson address the current status of art and earth science collaborations and new directions that could bolster their utility in geoscience research and education.

..and other topics of interest.

Visit creativedisturbance.org/womensday to hear the talented, powerful and diverse voices, or add your own podcast at the Voices of the Crowd channel to join these more than 25 voices.

Contact us at feedback.createdisturb@gmail.com if you would like to post a podcast!


 

What is Creative Disturbance

Creative Disturbance is an international, multi-lingual, online platform that (once complete) will provide a unique virtual environment for the intellectually curious across the globe to meet, network, collaborate, create, and socialize.

One means of both sharing and spurring such interactions is through a dynamic collection of podcasts crowdsourced and produced by Creative Disturbance members.

These ‘conversations’ help illuminate and inform others on matters of interest across the Creative Disturbance community.

Upcoming ATX LASER: Where Art Intersects Science in Austin, on March 12

Texas has become a hub for attracting cross-disciplinary leaders. The next ATX LASER (Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous) on March 12 will gather many of these thought leaders and innovators together.  This panel of Texas-based practitioners reflects the diversity and interests of the growing network, which seeks to become the leading advocate for collaboration among the sciences, engineering, arts and design, fostering innovation and learning that impact community sustainability and economic growth.

WHAT: ATX LASER: Where Art Intersects Science in Austin

WHERE: Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum, 605 Robert E. Lee Rd, Austin, TX 78704

WHEN: 7:00pm – 9:30pm, March 12, 2015

RSVP: atxlaser.eventbrite.com

MEDIA: For more information contact Diane Sikes at programs@umlaufsculpture.org and 512-445-5582


 

Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum presents 

ATX LASER: Where Art Meets Science in Austin

Interactive series gives new insight into seemingly opposing worlds

AUSTIN, TEXAS—Inspired by a noticeable trend of growing interest in the convergence of art, science and technology, the Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum (Umlauf) in partnership with Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology will host its fourth ATX LASER (Austin – Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous) event March 12.  The engaging series is free and open to the public.

Guest speakers will include:

Interactive artist and researcher Jinsil Hwaryoung Seo.

Jinsil Hwaryoung Seo focuses on aesthetics of interactive experience. Currently she is an assistant professor in the Department of Visualization at the College of Architecture and a faculty fellow in the Center for Health Systems & Design at Texas A&M University. With interdisciplinary, interactive art practice, Seo investigates the intersection between body, nature and technology. Her current research concentrates on designing for tangible and kinetic aesthetics in the contexts of performance, child development and health.

Artist, scientist, and creative catalyst Ruth West.

Ruth West envisions a future in which art + science integration opens new portals of imagination, invention, knowledge, and communication across cultures to create breakthrough solutions for our most pressing global problems. Ruth directs the xREZ Art + Science Lab and is an associate professor at the University of North Texas cross-appointed in the College of Visual Art and Design (New Media Art & Design), College of Information (Information Sciences), College of Engineering (Computer Science) and College of Arts and Sciences (Biological Sciences).

Artist and cross-disciplinary collaborator Carol LaFayette.

Carol LaFayette collaborates with scientists and engineers to invent unique experiences based on interactions among flora, fauna, and humans in rural landscapes. Her work with leafcutting ants is documented in the PBS series “State of Tomorrow:” the first 3D, immersive map of a vast Atta texana colony. Carol’s artwork is in collections at the Museum of Modern Art, New Museum of Contemporary Art, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. She has exhibited interactive installations and video worldwide, including LAB ’11, Sweden; SIGGRAPH; Zebra Poetry on Film, Berlin; Filmstock, UK; and Solomon Projects, Atlanta. Reviews and papers have been published in BBC Technology News, Wired, and Leonardo. She is Professor in the Department of Visualization and Director of the Institute for Applied Creativity at Texas A&M University. Carol serves as Principal Investigator of an NSF-supported project to form the SEAD network for collaboration among the sciences, engineering, arts, and design.

Assistant Professor of Behavioral and rain Sciences Gagan Wig.

Dr. Wig’s research program uses a combination of structural and functional imaging tools to understand the organization of large-scale human brain networks and how these networks change over the adult-lifespan. He uses this information to guide studies related to mnemonic and attentional processes, with a particular focus on understanding the sources of individual differences in memory and attention and how they may be modified by aging and disease. In collaboration with Dr. Roger Malina¹s ArtSci lab at UTD, Dr. Wig has been exploring ways to Œdramatize¹ brain connectome data using dynamic representations that incorporate sight and sound. He will present an overview of some the recent insight revealed in his studies of brain connectivity networks and aging, and how data dramatization may reveal novel ways of understanding and appreciating the complex patterns that are present throughout the connections in our brains.

Discussion will be moderated by Roger Malina, space scientist and astronomer.  Malina is a Distinguished Professor of Art and Technology and Professor of Physics at the University of Texas at Dallas and the Executive Editor of the Leonarndo Publications at MIT Press.

Following the speaker presentations, an open discussion will commence where participation is welcomed and encouraged from all attendees. For more information about ATX LASER and other Umlauf events, please visit umlaufsculpture.org


 

About ATX LASER

ATX LASER was conceived by J.D. Talasek, UMLAUF scholar-in-residence, in partnership with the nonprofit Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology (Leonardo/ISAST). Talasek is Director of Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. and the founder of the D.C. Art Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER) program. His co-organizers for ATX LASER are Katie Robinson Edwards, PhD., UMLAUF Curator, and Diane Sikes, UMLAUF Director of Programs.

About Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology

The Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology (Leonardo/ISAST) is a nonprofit organization that serves the global network of distinguished scholars, artists, scientists, researchers, and thinkers through programs focused on interdisciplinary work, creative output and innovation. Visit the Leonardo/ISAST website for more information at www.leonardo.info

About the Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum

Founded in 1991, The Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization established around a vast collection of work by American sculptor Charles Umlauf who donated his home, studio and 168 pieces of sculpture to the City of Austin. The property was then transformed into a sculpture garden and exhibits the work of the prolific artist.

The museum’s mission is to provide educational experiences that encourage understanding and appreciation of sculpture in a natural setting through workshops, classes, tours and exhibitions.

The year 2014 marks the expansion of the museum’s initiatives, including the connection of the museum to the residence and studio of Charles Umlauf as well as the update and extenuation of the museum’s educational and public programming, benefiting the Austin community and visitors from across the world.

Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks – 5th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2014

Event to be held at the following time, date, and location:

Tuesday, June 3, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 5:30 PM (CEST)

Clark Kerr Campus
2601 Warring Street
Berkeley, CA 94720

Our symposium features a keynote by Lada Adamic (Data Science at Facebook); and contributions by Anamaria Berea
(Byzantine iconography); Giorgio Caviglia, Nicole Coleman and Dan Edelstein (ideographic networks); Claire Kovacs
(Paris artist networks); Jaimie Murdock, Robert Light, Katy Borner and Colin Allen (deconstructing two cultures); Arram
Bae, Doheum Park, Yong-Yeol Ahn and Juyong Park (Western classical music); Kim Albrecht, Marian Dörk, and Boris
Müller (visualizing cultural network dynamics); Dmitry Zinoviev (meaning of complexity); and Heidi Boisvert
(networked performances). Our acceptance rate was 25%.

FOR THE FULL PROGRAMM and more information on our symposium,
please go to http://artshumanities.netsci2014.net

EBOOK AVAILABLE of all leonardo articles on complex networks:

http://ahcncompanion.info/

The Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks organizers,
Maximilian Schich, Roger Malina, Isabel Meirelles, and
Meredith Tromble
artshumanities.netsci@gmail.com

UTDallas Crowdfund Workshop

 

 Come join us this Friday (April 4th)  from 11am – 3pm for this unique opportunity! It is completely free for Students, Faculty, and Staff.

The event will be located in the Faculty & Staff Dining Room SU – UTD Campus

Campus Map

The Crowdfund Workshop is presented by CrowdFormation.org, the National Crowd Funding Association and the UTDallas Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

Topics Discussed:

-Overview of CrowdFunding

 

-Practical Crowdfunding

-Featuring a panel that will discuss their experiences with crowdfunding

-Overview of Equity Crowdfunding

 

-Overview of Academic Crowdfunding

 

Speakers for the event include:

Dr.Bruce Gnade-

-UTDallas: Vice President for Research

Dr.Roger Malina

-UTDallas: Arts and Technology

David Marlett

-Executive Director, National Crowdfunding Association

Dan Bochsler

-UTDallas: Naveen Jindal School of Management

Madison Pedigo

-UTDallas: Naveen Jindal School of Management

Jed Moody

-Haynes & Boone, Attorneys at Law

Jeremy Forsberg

-University of Texas at Arlington: Assistant VP of Research

For More information, check out the detailed itinerary 

ArtSciLab Researchers Roger Malina and Andrew Blanton Present their work at the Inaugural LASER

ArtSciLab researchers Roger Malina and Andrew Blanton will be presenting their work at the inaugural LASER in Austin Texas on March 4.

The LASER series is being organised by JD Talasek, the Cultural Director of the US National Academy of Science. Malina and Blanton will present in particular the ArtSciLab work in collaboration with Professor Gagan Wig of UT Dallas ( http://bbs.utdallas.edu/people/detail.php5?i=1131 )

His research program uses a combination of structural and functional imaging tools (including fMRI, DTI, and TMS) to understand the organization of large-scale human brain networks and how these networks change over the adult-lifespan. The Art Sci Lab is working with him to develop innovative ways of representing the data, in particular using data sonication techniques.

The resulting work is intended to develop scientifically useful research tools but also create compelling art work.

Further details on the ArtSciLab can be found at : https://artscilab.atec.io/

Join us for

The Inaugural ATX LASER: March 4th , 2014 at 7 p.m.

Space is limited so RSVP today by emailing atxlaser@umlaufsculpture.org

The UMLAUF proudly announces the inauguration of ATX LASER (Austin, Texas – Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous), a salon series culminating at the intersection of art and science. In today’s environment of new technologies and scientific advancements, cultivation of creativity among all areas of human endeavor is paramount to knowledge production and fully understanding the impact of our changing world on the development of our identity within it. Over the next year, this salon will explore such diverse topics as: the impact and creative application of technology; the intersection of anatomy, art and genetics; arts role in environmental education and activism; visualizing and understanding Big Data; building community and communication between disciplines; and much more.

Akin to successful art-science programs in London, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, Stanford University, UC Berkeley, UCLA, UC David, UC Santa Cruz, and New York City, ATX LASER provides an opportune environment for progressive thought leaders to come together to form community and explore the intersections of disciplinary thinking. ATX LASER welcomes innovators of all types: artists, scientists, curators, scholars, engineers, designers, and educators, to participate. Throughout his life’s work, Charles Umlauf explored the relationship of art and science through both process and symbolism. Emphasizing the importance of sharing ideas and knowledge as a platform of its mission, the UMLAUF offers the ideal creative crucible for seemingly unrelated disciplines to reconvene.

Each ATX LASER session will feature multimedia presentations and three to four speakers, each given the opportunity to address a compelling aspect of their research. Following the presentations, an open discussion will commence where participation is welcomed and encouraged from all attendees. All ATX LASERs are free and open to the public. Please join us at ATX LASER’s launch: Tuesday, March 4th, 2014.

The UMLAUF is proud to be partnering with Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology (Leonardo/ISAST), a non-profit organization that serves the global network of distinguished scholars, artists, scientists, researchers, and thinkers through programs focused on interdisciplinary work, creative output, and innovation.

ATX LASER was conceived by J.D. Talasek, Scholar-in-Residence, UMLAUF. Talasek is Director of Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. and the founder of that city’s DASER program. His co-organizers for ATX LASER are Katie Robinson Edwards, PhD., UMLAUF Curator, and Diane Sikes, UMLAUF Director of Programs. ATX LASER is made possible through the generous support of J.D. Talasek and the UMLAUF.

At ATX LASER, art and science will unite in the serene environment of Lawrence Speck’s architectural gem amidst the UMLAUF gardens. The UMLAUF was founded in 1991 with the mission of exhibiting the work of Charles Umlauf (1911-1994) and other contemporary sculptors in a natural setting and providing educational experiences that encourage the understanding and appreciation of sculpture. An inventive problem solver, in his lifetime Umlauf engaged with the fields of anatomy, architecture, engineering, and geology. ATX LASER pays homage to Umlauf’s creative vision and will include future sessions relating directly to the sculptor’s vast oeuvre.

The Inaugural ATX LASER: March 4th , 2014 at 7 p.m.

Space is limited so RSVP today by emailing atxlaser@umlaufsculpture.org

SPEAKERS:

o Katie Robinson Edwards , UMLAUF Curator

– TOPIC: A brief introduction on behalf of the UMLAUF

o J.D. Talasek , Moderator.

– TOPIC: “Shaping Community around Creativity and Innovation”

o Roger Malina , Arts and Technology Distinguished Chair, University of Texas at Dallas Roger. Malina is a physicist, astronomer, Executive Editor of Leonardo Publications at MIT Press, Professor of Physics and Associate Director of the Arts and Technology Program at UT Dallas.

– TOPIC: The ArtSciLab at UT Dallas opened in the fall of 2013 with the objective of enabling in depth collaboration between artists and scientists. Our first projects involve manipulating data from astronomy, brain sciences and geo-sciences

o Andrew Blanton , a composer and media artist. Blanton is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Texas at Dallas and is a Research Fellow in the ATEC ArtSciLab.

– TOPIC: interactive installation called MODULATOR, will be co-presenting with Roger Malina

o Francesca Samsel, Visual Artist. Austin-based artist Francesca Samsel uses scientific visualization and high-resolution displays to create digital murals inspired by scientific research.

– Topic: Art-Sci-Vis: Stirring the Mix, Creating Multiple Outcomes

o Kathy Ellins, Program Manager at the Institute for Geophysics in the Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin. Trained as a geochemist,

– Topic: Geoscience Through the Lens of Art: Examples From The American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting

BE A PART OF THE ATX LASER COMMUNITY. MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR UPCOMING SALONS AT THE UMLAUF:

May 20 , 2014

July 15, 2014

September 16, 2014

November 18, 2014

 

For more information visit http://umlaufsculpture.org/

Or email JD Talasek at jtalasek@nas.edu

RSVP at atxlaser@umlaufsculpture.org

Roger Malina appointed to International Program Committee for ISEA 2014

isea6The International Symposium on the Electronic Arts will be hosted by Zayed University and Other Locations in Dubai and the UAE in November 2014.

ISEA is one of the world’s most important international academic arts/technology event for the interdisciplinary discussion and showcase of creative productions applying new technologies in art, interactive, electronic and digital media. It’s an event that annually brings together artists, academics, scientists, and new media practitioners.

The symposium consists of three aspects of peer reviewed conference, internationally juried exhibitions, and various in-conjunction and other partner events–from video screenings to performances.

UT Dallas Professor Roger F Malina will be serving on the International Program Committee.