Marcel Cage and John Duchamp perform REUNION at Nine Evenings 2 in Seattle

On October 28, 2016 ArtSciLab team members will be performing “Data Stethoscope” brain connectome data in Seattle. Performance is dedicated to celebration of the 50th anniversary of Nine Evenings held in New York by EAT and Bell labs in 1966. 

The performing team includes: artist/musician Scot Gresham Lancaster, Tim Perkis, neuroscientist Gagan Wig and Roger Malina. The project includes also neuroscientists Micaela Chan and Neil Savalia, Art and Technology PhD student Veena Somareddy and the Make or Break gaming company, with Mike Leach and Robert Nally. A truly transdisciplinary, inter-generational, intercultural  team.

The performance will include the FMRI brain Connectome data sets for cohorts of 20, 40, 60, 80 year old. Gagan developed  a team to understand the way brain interconnections evolve with age and experience for healthy adults. The hope is to identify precursor anomalies that may lead to cognitive problems. The software has been developed with the use of data sonification to augment the data visualization of the networks, hence the title ‘data stethoscope”.

Scot Gresham Lancaster, Tim Perkis and Andrew Blanton will be performing three solos, with differing aesthetic approaches to the visualization and sound. At the conclusion of the performance, Scot has designed a chess board interface in homage to John Cage and Marcel Duchamp, who in 1968 performed a celebrated game of chess that triggered sound and music that they titled ”Reunion”.

Detailed story of the piece.

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Scot has invited Gagan and Roger to be chess performers for this chess performance in homage to John Cage and Marcel Duchamp, hence the meme John Duchamp and Marcel Cage!

To underline the appropriateness of this device, board was practiced by  University of Texas at Dallas Chess Team, which repeatedly wins national and international chess tournaments. Special thanks go out to James Stallings, Director of UTD chess program, and  to International master Zurabi Javakhadze from Georgia, who is ATEC major and member of ArtScience Lab. According to Roger Malina: his father, scientist-artist Frank Malina was an avid chess player and at home, playing chess was often the social platform for art-science technology discussions.

Scot Gresham Lancaster provides this personal recollection:

”Earlier in my career I had the opportunity to work closely with composer/performers John Cage and David Tudor. It was John Cage that connected me with Lowell Cross who designed the photoelectric enabled chess board that was an important part of the “Reunion” electro-acoustically enhanced chess match between Cage and Marcel Duchamp. I received the circuit for this chess board from Mr. Cross and built a working version of the board for a reenactment of the piece for a celebration of Cage’s work at a memorial concert at Mills College in Oakland,CA in 1998. This cemented my interest in using chess play as a source of indeterminacy as a  Post-Cage style musical performance organizing principle.

Fast forward some years later and we are working with the Art/Science lab and the Center for Vital Longevity at UTD and discover that the university has a world class chess program with full scholarships and several World Grand Masters. That program also has a new generation of digital chess boards that can be used to digitally communicate the moves of a chess game in real time. The opportunity arose to use the Art part of our Art/Science collaboration presented itself with an invitation for us to participate in the 50th Anniversary of the historic Engineering Art and Technology (EAT) 9 evenings performance. This time in Seattle and entitled 9E2. This is a wonderful opportunity for us to show our work and dedication to  really fully playing at the Art/Science boundary.

The Artists on the team are seasoned performers with decades of experience but the thought occurred to us that we could integrate the symbolic representation of brain activity, the chess game, as a way to get the scientists on the project directly involved in the performance itself. So while we are using a good part of the evening to directly create music using the tools we have been developing to research by visualizing and sonifying fMRI and EEG data in many different ways. Some of these techniques proved useful for the scientists, but all were created with an idea that they would be part of a human experience and therefore be crafted to bear some artistic interest. By the end of the evening the scientists themselves are driving the form of the visual and sonic interactions directly from the chess moves they are making. The symbolic meeting of the minds driving the multi sensory experience the audience is witnessing.

Special thanks go out to James Stalling of the UTD chess program, of course, the director of the two labs collaborating on this complex and fascinating project, Drs. Roger Malina and Gagan Wig and finally my artistic collaborators Andrew Blanton and Tim Perkis.”

Here is What Malina has to say about the event:

”We are unbearable excited as we countdown for tonight’s performance! I must admit this Art-Science collaboration is one of the most interesting and difficult projects I have been involved in – more difficult than most of the research projects in astrophysics that I have been involved in, for NASA or the European and French Space Agencies! The goal of having an art-science collaboration develop both research software that will help Gagan’s team make scientific discoveries and also the artists perform compelling art is a sweet spot of art-science practice.”

 

Event 9e2 is an art exhibition and performance series commemorating “9 Evenings: Theatre & Engineering,” an iconic exhibition 50 years ago in New York that sparked a new era of collaboration between artists, scientists, and engineers.

Clark Scholars Boost Research Skills Through Summer Program

Twenty-four UT Dallas students, most of them freshmen, got a head start on their undergraduate experiences by spending nine weeks this summer conducting research on campus.

The Anson L. Clark Summer Research Program, coordinated by the Office of Undergraduate Education, saw projects ranging from the development of prosthetic casings to the design of “smart” agricultural systems. Students recently displayed their research results during a poster presentation and symposium. Incoming UT Dallas students who have been awarded Academic Excellence Scholarships are eligible to apply to be Clark Scholars. No previous research experience is necessary.

“Every year I’m amazed at how these students progress in nine short weeks, both socially and in their grasp of advanced research methods,” said Courtney Brecheen, associate dean in the Office of Undergraduate Education. “For many, participation in this program is their first chance to socialize with other university students and become acclimated to campus. It doesn’t take long before they really come together as a group, and by the end of the summer, they have mastered the art of articulating complex research to a general audience.”

The 2016 class of Clark Scholars collaborated with mentors in School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication (ATEC), the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science. Nearly all of the students intend to continue their research with their mentors’ lab groups during the upcoming year, Brecheen said.

Dr. Paul Pantano, associate professor of chemistry and past recipient of the Provost’s Award for Faculty Excellence in Undergraduate Research Mentoring, serves as the program’s scientific adviser.

Among the participants was Joel Ewing, a first-year ATEC student, who worked with Cassini Nazir, ATEC professor and director of design and research of ArtSciLab, and Dr.Roger Malina  Distinguished Professor of Arts and Technology, to design a website. ARTECA — a collaboration between UT Dallas’ ArtSciLab, which Malina directs, and the MIT Press — will be an online curated space of essential content in an interdisciplinary field where art, science and technology meet.

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ATEC student Joel Ewing helped design a website that aggregates scholarly content in an interdisciplinary field that combines art, science and technology. Dr. Roger Malina, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Technology, was his faculty mentor.

 

“The problem was, there was no central place to access materials related to this field,” Ewing said. “When ARTECA is launched, UT Dallas students will have free access to it, and other universities can subscribe. My role as a designer was to look for and address issues that affect user experience.”

Hannah Barber, a first-year student in biomedical engineering who led a collaborative project with ATEC students to design and produce decorative casings for lower limb prosthetics. She worked with faculty mentor Dr. Robert Gregg, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and bioengineering, along with students of Andrew Scott, associate professor of arts and technology.

Computer science students Daniel Garcia and Christopher Janusa spent the summer working together to develop “smart” electronics for agriculture applications. Their faculty mentor was Dr. Subbarayan Venkatesan, professor of computer science.

“There is a need for agriculture systems that are automated, simple to use and configurable,” Garcia said. “This could include systems like automated irrigation and temperature control.”

The students envisioned a smart system that includes sensors and actuators that monitor, for example, temperature and soil moisture, and could be integrated with weather data to automatically adjust irrigation and other actions according to the forecast. Users could use a web interface to regulate the system, Garcia said.

The Clark Summer Research Program is funded by an endowment from the Clark Foundation, whose philanthropy has supported scholarly endeavors at several Texas colleges and universities, such as the Anson L. Clark Memorial Lecture and the Dr. Anson L. Clark Presidential Scholarship at UT Dallas.

From Dakar to Dallas: Creative Disturbance attends Gamecamp Senegal

Virtual Africa on Creative Disturbance

The Virtual Africa on Creative Disturbance

The Audiolats channel Virtual Africa on Creative Disturbance hosted a video conference between Dallas and Dakar where UT Dallas students engaged with Gamecamp Senegal attendees on topics relating to games, language, culture and creative industries.

Students from the School of Art, Technology and Emerging Communication at UT Dallas held a virtual meeting with Gamecamp organizer Kofi Sika Latzoo and Goethe Institut Sénégal’s director Michael Jeismann, led by Virtual Africa’s project coordinator and ATEC doctoral student Yvan Tina.

The group discussed the issue of technological development in some areas, the various business models available for the gaming industry, the implementation of transmedia narratives across multiple platforms, the role of government agencies in creative industry, and the future of mobile gaming in Africa.

Gamecamp Senegal at the Geothe Institut Dakar

It follows from that discussion that microtransactions currently constitutes the most reliable business plan for game developers in Sénégal due to the high cost of internet plans that keep most people from being able to play online with their smartphones. The microtransaction strategy allows one to progress at his/her own pace and to access the game offline. The low tech approach, as opposed to high tech (virtual and augmented reality), doesn’t have good days ahead given the rapid growtth of technology. However, there are alternative solutions such as the use of solar energy to deal with the access to electricity and the internet. One could even envision the emergence on new games based on this ecological approach. Similarly, the potential of serious games, through the gamification of many aspects of life, offer the opportunity to overcome the challenge of education in some African countries.

The last issue to be pointed out remains the incredible diversity of African societies, with thousands of languages and cultures, presents a real difficulty for game designers. It remains, however, that multilingualism and the development of African storytelling (based, for example, on oral traditions or afrofuturist speculations) would be an incredible asset for anyone involved in the African creative industries.

The Gamecamp—a festival which ran from July 14-17, 2016 in Dakar, Senegal—is a partnership with the Goethe Institut, the International Game Developers Association (IGDA Sénégal) and Orange Telecommunications. The festival has toured many African countries since its inception and was marked this year by the release of Google’s Cardboard as well as of NVIDIA’s Shield, the most powerful box android TV in the market, and the cloud gaming Geforce Now.

The festival allows attendees the opportunity to discover many games that have been developed in Sénégal such as Da’karapid, Cross Dakar City, HA Buggy and Diambar. Workshops for game designers on Unity, Game Design Canvas and several gaming tournaments (Call of Duty, Leagues of Legend) as well as an initiation to 360 panoramic photography (ConceptSky VT) are also offered in this program.

Creative Disturbance at ISEA

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Director of Design and Research for the ArtSciLab Cassini Nazir recently presented at the 22nd International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA), which was held in Hong Kong.

Talking on a panel titled “Creative Work and Well-Being,” Nazir discussed technical and design challenges for nurturing crowd sourced conversations on the Creative Disturbance platform. He outlined innovative methods in design, development and production for the podcast series.

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“Creative Disturbance is a platform developed in response to the need for a rupture in the arcane networks that currently connect creative people,” Nazir said. “We’re reaching an international, multilingual network and facilitating collaboration among the arts, sciences, and new technologies communities.”

Creative Disturbance celebrates its third year and at the time of the conference features 65 hours of content in ten languages, with over 270 contributors.

Creative Disturbance was one among many projects from UT Dallas faculty accepted into ISEA 2016:

  •  a robot that sleepwalks and Error as Armor. Data Obfuscation in the Yakamoto Industries Project, Dean Terry
  •  Vigil for Some Bodies, xtine burrough
  •  AIDS Quilt Touch Project, Anne Balsamo and Dale MacDonald

Founded in the Netherlands in 1990, ISEA International (formerly Inter-Society for the Electronic Arts) is an international non-profit organization fostering interdisciplinary academic discourse and exchange among culturally diverse organizations and individuals working with art, science and technology.

Over seven days, more than 450 speakers, workshops and presentations explored the theme of “Cultural Revolution,” investigating the borders between academia and artwork, practice and theory, systems and reality, and art and society.

Roger Malina talks about Sciences and New Technologies in CAP 2016 Colombia

CAP 2016 logo

Many of the world’s top astronomy communicators met in Medellin, Colombia in May to exchange views and experiences during the five-day ‘’Communicating Astronomy with the Public 2016’’ Conference.

Organized by International Astronomical Union (IAU) Commission C2, CAP is the largest event of its kind and continues a series of international gatherings held roughly every two years since 2002. It was the first CAP conference in South America.

Professional communicators, research astronomers, press officers, science journalists and facilitators covered 30 different topics, mostly concentrated on how to best bring Astronomy closer to people and engage different audiences with Science and Technology.

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Roger Malina’s keynote talk put main emphasis on Crossfertilizing the Arts, in retrospect of Sciences and New Technologies. The talk also included wide range of topics like: STEM and STEAM practices, astrophysics, and data visualization.

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Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks — 6th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2015

We are pleased to invite you to the

Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks — 6th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2015

taking place at the World Trade Center Zaragoza (WTCZ) in Spain,
on Tuesday, June 2, 2015.

Abstract:
For the sixth time, it is our pleasure to bring together pioneering work in the overlap of the arts, humanities, network research, data science, and information design. The 2015 symposium will again follow our established recipe and will leverage interaction between the areas by means of keynotes, a number of contributions, and a high-profile panel discussion.

In our call, we are looking for a diversity of research contributions revolving around networks in culture, networks in art, networks in the humanities, art about networks, and research in network visualization. Focussing on these five pillars that have crystallized out of our previous meetings, the 2015 symposium again strives to make further impact in the arts, humanities, and natural sciences.

Running parallel to the NetSci2015 conference, the symposium provides a unique opportunity to mingle with leading researchers in complex network science, potentially sparking fruitful collaborations.

As in previous years, selected papers will be published in print, both in a Special Section of Leonardo Journal MIT-Press and in a dedicated Leonardo eBook MIT-Press (see below).

Keynote:
Martin Krzywinski, Scientist, Genome Sciences Center, Vancouver, Canada
Make sure to check out his websites: http://mkweb.bcgsc.ca/ and http://circos.ca/

As in previous years, our high-profile keynote exemplifies the areas of cultural data science, network visualization, and/or network art.

Organizing committee:
Maximilian Schich, Associate Professor, ATEC, The University of Texas at Dallas, USA
Roger Malina, Executive Editor at Leonardo Publications, France/USA
Isabel Meirelles, Professor, Faculty of Design, OCAD University, Toronto, Canada

Submissions:
We invite you to submit a 300 word abstract including one descriptive figure by March 29, 2015 using our EasyChair submission link:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ahcn2015

Note: Our previous calls had an acceptance rate of 14 – 25%. Contributors were selected using a peer review process with three to four independent reviews per paper. Succesful submissions usually include an abstract not exceeding 300 words (plain text in the EasyChair submission form, no paper attachment), a striking figure (.jpg attachment, optimized to about 2000 x 1200 pixel in landscape aspect ratio), as well as an URL, all of which should express the relevance to our call. Previously selected paper topics cover a large territory, including networks in archaeology, art, film, history, music, literature, network visualization, and the culture of art-science. For previous examples see our companion website at ahcncompanion.info.

Important dates:
Deadline for submission: March 29, 2015.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by April 6, 2015.
Date of symposium: Tuesday, June 2, 2015, in Zaragoza, Spain.

Attendance:
Important note: The main NetSci2015 conference requires satellite attendees to pay at least a one day registration fee, in addition to registering to our symposium via EventBrite.

To attend our symposium,
1. Please get a free EventBrite ticket at http://ahcn2015.eventbrite.com/
2. Pay at least a one-day registration fee at http://www.netsci2015.net.

If you do not get an Eventbrite ticket (but you paid the NetSci2015 fee), there is still a chance to attend, as some ticket holders may not be able to show up. We will fill these spaces in Zaragoza, again on a first come, first serve basis. Priority will be given to those on our Eventbrite wait list and those registered for the main NetSci conference.

Program Schedule:

9:00 – Roger Malina: Opening Remarks

9:10 – Maximilian Schich: Introduction

9:30 – Martin Krzywinski: Keynote talk

10:30 – Coffee break

11:00-13:00 – Contributed talks

13:00 – Lunch

14:00-16:00 – Contributed talks

16:00 – Coffee break

16:30 – Panel discussion

17:30 – End


 

About NetSci:
NetSci is the flagship conference on Complex Networks promoted by the NetSci Society. It brings under one umbrella a wide variety of leading researchers, practitioners and stakeholders with direct interest in Network Science, from Physics to Computer Science, Biology, Social Sciences, Economics, Technological and Communication Networks, Big Data and so on.

Links:
eBook on Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks [Kindle Edition]:
Companion website: http://ahcncompanion.info/
For purchase (US $ 7.99): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007S0UA9Q

Special Section in Leonardo Journal:
Leonardo Journal 43:3, June 2010, pp. 212: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/43/3
Leonardo Journal 44:3, June 2011, pp. 239-267: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/44/3
Leonardo Journal 45:1, February 2012, pp. 77-89: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/45/1
Leonardo Journal 45:3, June 2012, pp. 275-286: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/45/3
Leonardo Journal 46:3, June 2013, pp. 267-279: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/46/3
Leonardo Journal 47:3, June 2014, pp. 265-278: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/leon/47/3

Previous Symposia websites:
2010: http://artshumanities.netsci2010.net
2011: http://artshumanities.netsci2011.net
2012: http://artshumanities.netsci2012.net
2013: http://artshumanities.netsci2013.net
2014: http://artshumanities.netsci2014.net

Other relevant sites:
ATEC, The University of Texas at Dallas: http://www.utdallas.edu/atec/
BarabásiLab, Northeastern University, Boston: http://www.barabasilab.com
Faculty of Design, OCAD University, Toronto: http://www.ocadu.ca/academics/faculty-of-design.htm
Leonardo/ISAST: http://www.leonardo.info
NetSci2015: http://www.netsci2015.net


 

Contact:
If you would like to be added to the list of interested people, please drop us an e-mail with the subject [ Please add me to the Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks list ] at artshumanities.netsci@gmail.com. Alternatively you can follow us on Twitter.

Creative Disturbance celebrates its first year by celebrating International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month

Through March, Creative Disturbance is featuring podcasts that showcase women voices in topics of art, science and technology. Some of the more popular podcasts include:

•  Art and Technology Pioneer Liliane Lijn

•  Music, Science and Technology pioneer Pauline Oliveros

•  Internet pioneer and innovator Christine Maxwell’s discussion with educator Rebecca Nix, Why Big Dreamers Need to Know About Big Data.

•  Artist Caroline Ometz‘s scientific and artistic collaborations with UT Southwestern researcher Dhru Deb in Cancer: Finding Beauty in the Beast.

•  Drs. Kathy Ellins and Susan Eriksson address the current status of art and earth science collaborations and new directions that could bolster their utility in geoscience research and education.

..and other topics of interest.

Visit creativedisturbance.org/womensday to hear the talented, powerful and diverse voices, or add your own podcast at the Voices of the Crowd channel to join these more than 25 voices.

Contact us at feedback.createdisturb@gmail.com if you would like to post a podcast!


 

What is Creative Disturbance

Creative Disturbance is an international, multi-lingual, online platform that (once complete) will provide a unique virtual environment for the intellectually curious across the globe to meet, network, collaborate, create, and socialize.

One means of both sharing and spurring such interactions is through a dynamic collection of podcasts crowdsourced and produced by Creative Disturbance members.

These ‘conversations’ help illuminate and inform others on matters of interest across the Creative Disturbance community.

Upcoming ATX LASER: Where Art Intersects Science in Austin, on March 12

Texas has become a hub for attracting cross-disciplinary leaders. The next ATX LASER (Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous) on March 12 will gather many of these thought leaders and innovators together.  This panel of Texas-based practitioners reflects the diversity and interests of the growing network, which seeks to become the leading advocate for collaboration among the sciences, engineering, arts and design, fostering innovation and learning that impact community sustainability and economic growth.

WHAT: ATX LASER: Where Art Intersects Science in Austin

WHERE: Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum, 605 Robert E. Lee Rd, Austin, TX 78704

WHEN: 7:00pm – 9:30pm, March 12, 2015

RSVP: atxlaser.eventbrite.com

MEDIA: For more information contact Diane Sikes at programs@umlaufsculpture.org and 512-445-5582


 

Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum presents 

ATX LASER: Where Art Meets Science in Austin

Interactive series gives new insight into seemingly opposing worlds

AUSTIN, TEXAS—Inspired by a noticeable trend of growing interest in the convergence of art, science and technology, the Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum (Umlauf) in partnership with Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology will host its fourth ATX LASER (Austin – Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous) event March 12.  The engaging series is free and open to the public.

Guest speakers will include:

Interactive artist and researcher Jinsil Hwaryoung Seo.

Jinsil Hwaryoung Seo focuses on aesthetics of interactive experience. Currently she is an assistant professor in the Department of Visualization at the College of Architecture and a faculty fellow in the Center for Health Systems & Design at Texas A&M University. With interdisciplinary, interactive art practice, Seo investigates the intersection between body, nature and technology. Her current research concentrates on designing for tangible and kinetic aesthetics in the contexts of performance, child development and health.

Artist, scientist, and creative catalyst Ruth West.

Ruth West envisions a future in which art + science integration opens new portals of imagination, invention, knowledge, and communication across cultures to create breakthrough solutions for our most pressing global problems. Ruth directs the xREZ Art + Science Lab and is an associate professor at the University of North Texas cross-appointed in the College of Visual Art and Design (New Media Art & Design), College of Information (Information Sciences), College of Engineering (Computer Science) and College of Arts and Sciences (Biological Sciences).

Artist and cross-disciplinary collaborator Carol LaFayette.

Carol LaFayette collaborates with scientists and engineers to invent unique experiences based on interactions among flora, fauna, and humans in rural landscapes. Her work with leafcutting ants is documented in the PBS series “State of Tomorrow:” the first 3D, immersive map of a vast Atta texana colony. Carol’s artwork is in collections at the Museum of Modern Art, New Museum of Contemporary Art, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. She has exhibited interactive installations and video worldwide, including LAB ’11, Sweden; SIGGRAPH; Zebra Poetry on Film, Berlin; Filmstock, UK; and Solomon Projects, Atlanta. Reviews and papers have been published in BBC Technology News, Wired, and Leonardo. She is Professor in the Department of Visualization and Director of the Institute for Applied Creativity at Texas A&M University. Carol serves as Principal Investigator of an NSF-supported project to form the SEAD network for collaboration among the sciences, engineering, arts, and design.

Assistant Professor of Behavioral and rain Sciences Gagan Wig.

Dr. Wig’s research program uses a combination of structural and functional imaging tools to understand the organization of large-scale human brain networks and how these networks change over the adult-lifespan. He uses this information to guide studies related to mnemonic and attentional processes, with a particular focus on understanding the sources of individual differences in memory and attention and how they may be modified by aging and disease. In collaboration with Dr. Roger Malina¹s ArtSci lab at UTD, Dr. Wig has been exploring ways to Œdramatize¹ brain connectome data using dynamic representations that incorporate sight and sound. He will present an overview of some the recent insight revealed in his studies of brain connectivity networks and aging, and how data dramatization may reveal novel ways of understanding and appreciating the complex patterns that are present throughout the connections in our brains.

Discussion will be moderated by Roger Malina, space scientist and astronomer.  Malina is a Distinguished Professor of Art and Technology and Professor of Physics at the University of Texas at Dallas and the Executive Editor of the Leonarndo Publications at MIT Press.

Following the speaker presentations, an open discussion will commence where participation is welcomed and encouraged from all attendees. For more information about ATX LASER and other Umlauf events, please visit umlaufsculpture.org


 

About ATX LASER

ATX LASER was conceived by J.D. Talasek, UMLAUF scholar-in-residence, in partnership with the nonprofit Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology (Leonardo/ISAST). Talasek is Director of Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. and the founder of the D.C. Art Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER) program. His co-organizers for ATX LASER are Katie Robinson Edwards, PhD., UMLAUF Curator, and Diane Sikes, UMLAUF Director of Programs.

About Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology

The Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology (Leonardo/ISAST) is a nonprofit organization that serves the global network of distinguished scholars, artists, scientists, researchers, and thinkers through programs focused on interdisciplinary work, creative output and innovation. Visit the Leonardo/ISAST website for more information at www.leonardo.info

About the Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum

Founded in 1991, The Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization established around a vast collection of work by American sculptor Charles Umlauf who donated his home, studio and 168 pieces of sculpture to the City of Austin. The property was then transformed into a sculpture garden and exhibits the work of the prolific artist.

The museum’s mission is to provide educational experiences that encourage understanding and appreciation of sculpture in a natural setting through workshops, classes, tours and exhibitions.

The year 2014 marks the expansion of the museum’s initiatives, including the connection of the museum to the residence and studio of Charles Umlauf as well as the update and extenuation of the museum’s educational and public programming, benefiting the Austin community and visitors from across the world.